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Bizzare Google Earth images of my home town. Answered

I was fiddling around with google earth the other day when I realized that I've never looked at the area around my home town in Nebraska. I dialed in the coordinates and pulled up the satellite images, and what I found was so profoundly strange that I felt compelled to share it.

What you are seeing here are topographical images of prairie land and cows. The land consists of small rolling hills of dry grassland, and as you can see, the only landmarks to speak of are the cattle stock tanks. These tanks are essentially circular, large, metal, outdoor swimming pools, some as wide as 30 feet across. The tanks are placed on some of the higher hills with a windmill powered pump to keep the tank full of fresh water. Cattle are then let loose on the land to graze on grass and drink from the tanks.

Over time the cattle wear down paths in the grass leaving only dusty trails concentrated around the tanks. I am speculating here a bit, but my theory is that rainfall then follows these trails down the hills and creates the strange, vein like lines through the grass. I don't know how long the area has been used for keeping cattle, but my father grew up here and will be able to tell me more later.

The final image is of the developed farm land a little closer to civilization. Most people don't know this, but Nebraskans are really into pie charts. Ok, that may be just me, these are are the patterns left by automatic springler systems. They are literally "crop circles" as corn and sugar beets are only planted within the area that the center pivot sprinkler can reach.

PS: These stock tanks are ripe with salamanders, but I still have yet to learn how they got in tanks in the first place? It's too dry to walk to the tanks, and they are pretty far from natural water anyway. There is a massive aquifer underneath all of this, maybe they get pumped up into the tanks? Can salamanders live in aquifers?

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AngryRedhead
AngryRedhead

7 years ago

Very cool! Around here, there's Luecke Farm. Online, there's a lot of talk of a megalomaniac who did it, but my husband said that it was a tactic to prevent eminent domain by establishing the property as a visual navigation marker for pilots. Or something like that.

Luecke.jpg
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Kiteman
Kiteman

7 years ago

I was looking for something in London, and found a low-flying aircraft over Russell Square...

Screenshot_2013-06-25-20-37-12.png
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SpringRobin
SpringRobin

Reply 7 years ago

lol.. that is very cool... hope it wasn't too low.

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murphybedhq
murphybedhq

7 years ago

ha ha love these kind of Google earth images :)

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liquidhandwash
liquidhandwash

8 years ago

this is he current Google earth image of the school I attend, can you see it. disgruntled student with weed killer!

Screenshot-6.png
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Xixfas
Xixfas

Reply 8 years ago

just for that im subscribing to you.
XD

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liquidhandwash
liquidhandwash

Reply 8 years ago

thanks, there is a rumor that it was traced. :-0

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Antzy Carmasaic
Antzy Carmasaic

Reply 8 years ago

haha... Very creative 'crop circles'. Guess they didn't do it for google earth. For what reason they did this? I'm assuming they didn't have a helicopter handy for taking photos :D

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liquidhandwash
liquidhandwash

Reply 8 years ago

I guess he was pissed off about something, you could see it clearly from the ground

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freeza36
freeza36

Reply 8 years ago

If only I knew when they plan to update...

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Tomdf
Tomdf

Reply 8 years ago

Haha. I'm guess I'm not mature enough yet that I'm not amused by that.

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Syn7
Syn7

Reply 8 years ago

I have marked an area near my house to see how often google updates. So far it's been over a year and no change. I see a whole new sport to see who can become the most legendary google earth infiltrator. Crop circles are too easy.

That is a big etch, in that pic above. I have no doubt it was for the benefit of google earth and any vehicles flying over.

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ilpug
ilpug

8 years ago

Cool! I love google Earth, it shows some stuff you wouldn't believe. I use it extensively in urban exploration to locate manholes or tunnel entrances or creekbeds in cities.

Plus, an easy way to look over your neigbor's back fence.

Assuming I remember I'll post a few pictures I've saved from it.

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Tomdf
Tomdf

Reply 8 years ago

"Urban Exploration"?! That sounds mysteriously exciting! Do you live near a large amount of tunnels or something similar? Is there anything interesting under the manholes?

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ilpug
ilpug

Reply 8 years ago

It is mysterious, also fun! I don't actually live in an area with a lot of tunnels, but I do visit places and explore there. I'm seriously considering writing a how-to guide about exploration. Under manholes can be anything really.

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ilpug
ilpug

8 years ago

Cool! I love google Earth, it shows some stuff you wouldn't believe. I use it extensively in urban exploration to locate manholes or tunnel entrances or creekbeds in cities.

Plus, an easy way to look over your neigbor's back fence.

Assuming I remember I'll post a few pictures I've saved from it.

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iceng
iceng

8 years ago

Cows may come, cows may go.
But the bull in these pages goes on forever.

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pmshrink
pmshrink

8 years ago

I love these images. The last one looks like a modernist painting, amazing.

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serovan14
serovan14

Reply 8 years ago

Very interesting to know.

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gmoon
gmoon

8 years ago

A far more interesting post than I normally see here. Maybe it's the artistic quality of the satellite pix...

We see circular irrigation crawlers in the Midwest, particularly when we drive between here (Ohio) and Chicago. They are simple but massive machines.

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Tomdf
Tomdf

Reply 8 years ago

Thanks. They sure look different from the air don't they.

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gmoon
gmoon

Reply 8 years ago

Yep. It's fun to see some old agrarian wind technology in those photos, too.

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liquidhandwash
liquidhandwash

8 years ago

hi there, about your salamander mystery, I have seen the same phenomenon with carp, and the answer is that carp have sticky eggs which get stuck to water birds feet,and they then get a free ride to another river pond lake or whatever

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Toga_Dan
Toga_Dan

Reply 8 years ago

Interestin. stuff like this explains why they thought in the middle ages that life just spontaneously appears.

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Tomdf
Tomdf

Reply 8 years ago

Seriously, that is really interesting. You've solved a mystery that has plagued me since my childhood. I would have never, ever guessed that, but now it makes perfect sense. Thanks :D

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ChrysN
ChrysN

8 years ago

Cool, I love the "crop circle" patterns on farmland.

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lemonie
lemonie

8 years ago

"Nebraska's tall as Heaven and it's twice as wide, it's bound to take a lifetime to reach the other side."(Preacher Boy, album "Crow", but I can't find it on t'internet)

L

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Jayefuu
Jayefuu

8 years ago

That's pretty interesting :)