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Can anyone help, RC control problems Answered

I have these controls

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXLDP9**&P=ML

On the receiver end each channel has 2 negatives and one positive so you can switch polarity. My transmitter is not doing anything on any channel and I get constant current flow in one direction even when the transmitters off. I don’t know much about these types of controls and I looked through the manual and can’t find anything to help. Is there something wrong with the controls or is something else going on? Can anyone help?

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Goodhart
Goodhart

12 years ago

I am not familiar with them myself, but just a probing question or two: when you say that the transmitter is not doing anything on any channel, do you have a reliable method of detecting the output signal?
And when you say that you get constant current flow do you mean a constant signal? or current to the transmitter itself?

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kendallickes
kendallickes

Reply 12 years ago

To answer goodheart. As far as I can tell the transmitter is not doing anything to the receiver at all and it should. They are on the same frequency and they are both on. I am getting constant current flow from the receiver. How can this control something if it always has current.

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Goodhart
Goodhart

Reply 12 years ago

it could depend on whether the receiver translated that as idle or go, as it were. Increase in current and alteration of frequencies could invoke control. Or they may be off by a bit and what you are detecting may be a subcarrier, or resonant frequency.

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

12 years ago

The link to the picture just shows a radio control transmitter. You should have the corresponding receiver pack that goes with it and matches the transmitting frequency of the transmitter. You then need to have the matching servos(motors) for that system that can respond to the commands that the receiver pack gets from the transmitter. The commands may be in various forms of electronic signals so I don't know if you can figure anything out simply without having a servo attached. You would usually have a servo control a single function on the radio-control plane such as lifting the flaps or turning the rudder. The transmitter having more than one channel can refer to how many servos it can control at one time and not necessarily on how many different frequencies it transmits on. Good luck.

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kendallickes
kendallickes

Reply 12 years ago

I have the matching receiver on 72.23 mhz. I’m trying to make an rc robot from scratch. My thought was that they transmitter puts out a signal and the receiver energizes the ‘channel.’ Basically I thought I could cut a servo wire and connect it directly to what I want to control. i.e. a relay or motor. I have been testing the receivers connections at a cut servo wire by connecting it to a small electric motor. 2 of the 3 wires always make the circuit work, the other does nothing. You said there are 2 positives and one negative? I though it was 2 negatives and one positive? Like I said I never used them before just want to be clear. Do the servos somehow decode a pulse signal from the transmitter? If so can I take a servo apart and connect my wires where the servo motor is to run the relays on my circuit? Or is there some other/better way to make this work?

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

Reply 12 years ago

I'm not an expert on motors but I believe there is control circuitry in a servo mechanism to regulate the range of motion. I don't know if it is stepper motor-like or just a regular motor controlled by digital or pulsed signals. You will have to research that or experiment by taking an actual servo apart.