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Chopping Up an stl file into multiples Answered

Hi Everyone, I'm looking for some software help.  I have a single stl file of a Johnny 5 robot.  I don't want to print it all in one part. What I'd like to do is chop the arms, head, and other random parts off, and save them as separate stl files so the robot can be re-assembled.

Ideally the chopped off arms would have male-female connectors to fit back into the body they were removed from.

I'm looking for input as to what would be the best method to accomplish this both in software and technique. Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Downunder35m

4 years ago

I've done some of that using Sketchup, but most other 3D programs like Blender should be able to do it too.
Cutting your pieces is quite simple by deleting the unwanted parts of the mesh / model and repairing the resulting hole.
Some connector can be found here in some project or on Thingiverse or similar sites.
You still have to do the alignment and fitting of the connector into your model manually.
There is no software I know that is capable of doing what you need just with a few clicks.

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gravityisweakDownunder35m

Reply 4 years ago

Thanks for that. I was kind of hoping there existed a slicer out there that could maybe do customizable slice sizes with the option of having the parts physically connect to either snap together or fit tightly together to allow rotation. I suppose this is more of a custom job. I'll have to chop off each body part to export it as its own .stl file. I've found that Meshmixer is capable of doing this well enough. Building a connector to rejoin the arm to the shoulder after I slice it is going to be difficult for me. Any advice on that would be appreciated.

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Downunder35mgravityisweak

Reply 4 years ago

Just check some designs on Thingiverse or similar sites and copy the part that joins.
Depending on the size you could substitude by modifying these little plastic clips that hold the inside panels on your car.
You know, the thing goes in the hole and you push a pin in to secure it in place?
A joint that moves more than a rotating motion will require a ball and socket though - which might not fit the way you like in your model.

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gravityisweakDownunder35m

Reply 4 years ago

Luckily Johnny 5 was an old robot so I can probably get away with simple rotation. I think a snap pin type connector would work great, I'll have to see if I can find a design for one that can be applied to the model I'm working with.

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bravoechonovember1

4 years ago

while you are at it why not make a costume out of it with pepakura?

Oh god, that would be amazing but I don't think I'd ever finish in time. Maybe just the head though, with controllable eye flaps?