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Does any one know how to make an Ne-2 joule thief ?? Answered

Recently I’ve been researching on how high voltage joule thief works. The popular high voltage joule thief videos out there are known as Jeanna’s light if I’m not mistaken. I also built my own little LED joule thief circuit, it appear success after all with a 2n3904. But I want to take the concept a little bit further, so I decided to attempt on the high voltage joule thief circuit. It appear no luck, I have 120 turns for high voltage on my ferrite core (1 turn = 1 volt). I know it’s the same principle as the LED joule thief but with the LED removed. I have two 1kohm resistors and I connected them in parallel to get 500ohm resistance. I connected them all like the LED joule thief, but it seems like I did something wrong.  So I ask for further instruction.

Parts that I use:
40 or 30 gauge magnet wire (high voltage windings)
20 gauge magnet wire
2n3904 transistor (Don’t know if that’s the right transistor for this circuit, but it’s for experimental purposes only.)
2x 1Kohm resistors in parallel = 500 Ohm resistance
AA rechargeable battery.
The thick magnet wire are 7 turns.

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electric1981
electric1981

6 years ago

use less turns on the primary!! like one bet you will get more volts

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

7 years ago

Try following this instructable. He recommends 2.4-3V to make it work.

https://www.instructables.com/id/high-voltage-joule-thief/

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BlackWolf1024
BlackWolf1024

Answer 7 years ago

I've checked, for some reason I can't get the neon to light. The previous winding in the core gives me out of range of voltage. But now I have 85 turns and did what exactly he did, I gives me around ~11-20 sometimes 16 volts. No F**KING hope, makes me really frustrating. 85 turns HV, 5 Turns on the LV.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

More input volts may be needed...

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BlackWolf1024
BlackWolf1024

Answer 7 years ago

Are you saying that, 85 turns doesn't meet the high voltage requirements ?

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

...and another thing.... the induced voltage in the secondary depends on the rate of change of flux in the core. which is affected by the core's properties, and the primary winding. My instructable on flyback transformers, although not directly related to this, may offer some concepts

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

I'm saying 2 things, 1.) you may well need more turns and 2.) You may need more input volts to kick the thing into life - double up you AA batteries and see what happens.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

7 years ago

Have you actually tried measuring the voltage across the neon ?

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BlackWolf1024
BlackWolf1024

Answer 7 years ago

I'm getting 0.11 volts DC on the high voltage winding.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

Try AC. That's what should be there.....

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BlackWolf1024
BlackWolf1024

Answer 7 years ago

On AC I'm Getting 2.1 volt. Can't light up the NEON. But the led have no problem on lighting it up.