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Electricity for the challenged Answered

I have a US plug AC/DC power adapter and need to get a European version. The specks on the adapter are input: 120VAC 60Hz 24 W and the output: 10 VDC 1400mA. I really don't have a clue as to what all these numbers mean but understand at a bare minimum I need something with a 10 VDC output. I've looked around at some shops and can find adapters that say 9v 1000mA and others that are 12v 1500mA. Do I need to get the exact voltage (I presume the v stands for volts)? What about the amperes ( I believe that mA is some increment of amperage)? Can I fudge the numbers a bit to save money and time instead of trying to get the exact configuration of the original adapter? Thanks for any help in clarifying this for me.

Discussions

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NachoMahma

11 years ago

. You can get a 220-to-110VAC "travel converter" at most electronics stores. . . How exact you have to be when comparing specs depends on what the driven device is. For mechanical toys, &c, you can be off quite a bit without causing too much trouble. For computers and other "delicate" electronics, there's not as much wiggle room. . Match the volts as closely as possible and the mA should be equal to or slightly above the specs (have to disagree with Kiteman on this point - a underpowered brick is a fire hazard).

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CrackpotNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Normally on the adapters they say if they will take 120 through 240 VAC. The one I have is says only 120. I'd rather not plug the American adapter into a converter that gets bulky and hot not to mention wasteful. The adapter is for an Ipod clock radio that I bought in the states but want to use in Europe. Since it came with a power adapter I figured I could swap the us adapter for a EU one. I really appreciate your help with this. I've always gotten confused when trying to figure out electrical stuff. Just to reiterate a 9v and 1500mA should work? Thanks again

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NachoMahmaCrackpot

Reply 11 years ago

. Not sure about the V, but, if the cradle is USB compatible (ie, 5V), I'll bet a quarter it will work. A schematic for the cradle might help - if there is a 7805 chip (or possibly a 7905), that would be a good indicator that 9V could work.

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NachoMahmaCrackpot

Reply 11 years ago

. Have you tried contacting Jensen? Doesn't look like I'm gonna be much help and no one else has chimed in.

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CrackpotNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Actually you've been a big help. At least I have some understanding now of what the numbers mean and what I should be careful about. Thanks.

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trebuchet03Kiteman

Reply 11 years ago

Fire Hazard... I know first hand :p At least, there was smoke and upon dissection, the windings had fused and shorted out from excessive heat damage.

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NachoMahmaKiteman

Reply 11 years ago

. If you pull 1400mA through a 1000mA brick, it will get very hot.

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KitemanNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Are you sure? When I tried to run a 1200mA DVD player via a 700mA adaptor, all that happened was the DVD wouldn't run.

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NachoMahmaKiteman

Reply 11 years ago

. That's possibly because you were pulling enough to shutdown the PS. Or maybe the DVD wasn't getting enough volts (PS pulled down below rated V). . Granted, it's not a good idea to have too much PS (primarily because of V regulation) - that's why I said "slightly above." . The 1400/100mA figures were just pulled out of the air. Point was that PSs that are putting out above their rating get hot.

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Kiteman

11 years ago

What are you running? Check the instruction manual, it should tell you the tolerances.

If in doubt, though, go for an under-powered transformer rather than an over-powered one, to save the risk of damaging your device.

(yes, "mA" = "milliAmps" (1000mA = 1A))