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Getting started with instructable Answered

Hi,

I am planning to shoot my first instructable project. But I am not sure on what rigs (like camera) I should use to bring out a good instructable. Can you guys help me on this ? I am on very tight budget so please give me some cheaper solution. Btw all my projects would be electronic projects.

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seamster

Best Answer 4 years ago

Here's a collection of great projects that teach all sorts of things that will help you make great instructables:

https://www.instructables.com/id/how-to-write-a-gre...

I've been using the same old camera for all of my projects. I think it's a 5 megapixel point-and-shoot camera, and nothing too fancy. Try to use natural light as much as possible, take lots of photos, and then only share the very best ones. Those are my tips! :)

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Downunder35mseamster

Answer 4 years ago

1+
5MP is enoughwith decent light.
It is not the price of a cam that makes the image but the operator behind the cam ;)
Whenever possible use a tripod or when using a mobile phone make a simple mount for close up images.
Even a card board box with the phone taped over a hole works as a simple mount ;)

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Arjun Gseamster

Answer 4 years ago

Thank you for the suggestion seamster I hope my first ever electronic project & tutorial is good enough to present :)

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rickharris

4 years ago

good light

IN FOCUS!

Show the things people are going to nee to know about

Show any thing else you fell is interesting.

try to avoid confusing backgrounds

Try to get good sound if using video.

If using video I suggest you plan the shoot on paper before getting at it. having to make something again is a pain.

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Kitemanrickharris

Answer 4 years ago

+1

Fill the frame with your subject, use macro if you need to.

If you can't fill the frame, get as close as you can whilst staying in focus, then crop the image later.

Take LOTS of photos. I usually only use about one third of the photos I take, sometimes even less - it's easier to get a decent project when you're working with too many images than too few.