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Greasy hood filters screens? Answered

What is the best way to clean greasy metal hood filter screens?

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seandogue

4 years ago

Agitate and soak in a solution of very hot , boiling if possible, water with ammonia, or failing ammonia, use a liquid degreaser, (I have a 1 gallon jug of a commercial degreaser I use sparingly when I need for tough jobs), Dawn if you're sensitive or have children or etc.

You can use a long handled fork to agitate it occasionally, drain a bit and add more very hot water occasionally, rinse with boiling water, do it again if necc.

Even white vinegar and boiling water makes a very impressive degreaser when you agitate vigorously.

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seandogueseandogue

Answer 4 years ago

PS: Ammonia. All the normal cautionaries. Ammonia is not something I'd want my five year old playing with, and even for a "responsible adult" it can be dangerous.

Ventilate properly. Wear Playtex gloves or something if you have sensitive hands, keep away from children and animals.

Having said that, I think ammonia is an under-sung sundry item in the modern utilities closet... There's truth to the old adage that... It cuts grease

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seandogueseandogue

Answer 4 years ago

And finally, DO NOT USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH CLEANSER!

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seandogueseandogue

Answer 4 years ago

And by cleanser, I mean Ajax or Comet or other Chlorine based cleaning agents. Very bad very dangerous

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And one more thing, I really wish they had timed edits here.

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Victor805

4 years ago

I normally use detergent, but when it comes to
very oily surfaces with a crust of old oil like my fryer I fill my sink
with water and add half a cup of NaOH (caustic soda), I place everything inside and let it sit for a while, the oil turns into soap
and it dissolves in water. It works well with tough residues and it gets
into places you can't reach.

NaOH is caustic, so it's quite
nasty, so you can't use it with aluminum, this applies to the sink and
drain hole too. I suggest you make a test first. You also must use
gloves to avoid getting it on your skin. At least you don't have to
worry about toxic fumes or anything like that.

You might also not have access to NaOH, where I live it's sold in supermarkets.

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Wired_MistVictor805

Answer 4 years ago

hey what would that do to a stainless steel sink?

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Victor805Wired_Mist

Answer 4 years ago

My fryer is stainless steel and nothing happens to it, the plastics and everything else is fine too and my sink and countertop shows no signs of deterioration. It certainly attacks aluminum. It might take some time to react with aluminum objects because of the oxide layer, so don't wait for the reaction to occur, use a magnet to see if its steel or aluminum.

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VygerVictor805

Answer 4 years ago

Yes, you would deffinately have to do a test. Some of those metal screens are made with aluminum.

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Vyger

4 years ago

Liquid dish detergent. Not the dishwasher stuff, the stuff for hand washing dishes. It is made for that type of job. If they fit in the sink then soak them and spray off with hot water. Be aware though that any of the grease that does not mix with soap and flushes down the drain can solidify in the drain line and make a clog.

If it is warm outside a really good way is to put them in a 5 gallon bucket with hot water and detergent and let it soak until it cools off. Swish them around in the bucket and spray them off with a nozzle. Do it over the grass or dirt so it doesn't leave oil marks on the sidewalk or other cement. You can leave them dry on the grass.

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Wired_Mist

4 years ago

Not sure if i'd use a dishwasher, but the soap and water Idea is probably the way to go. Just soak it in warm soapy water for a few hours and most grime will melt right off. then use the sprayer to get the rest off. Doesn't have to be perfect; it will just get greesy again right?

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steveastrouk

4 years ago

We put ours through a dishwasher cycle....