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Grounding an Antenna Answered

I'm thinkin of puttin up a high antenna. Due to my location with a mountain between me and broadcast towers, reception can be sketchy. 

One concern is that of lightning strikes.  But if the antenna is grounded, wont that also ground out the microvoltage radio signals? How do I get microvolt signal without risk of megavolts burning the house down?

I've done a wee little bit of google research, but haven't seen this question addressed.

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Qcks

5 years ago

Ehhh.... off the top of my head, could you have a disconnect from the ground.
Something that you could throw when it was storming and something that you could leave in the open position the rest of the time.
It'd have to be a pretty bulky switch though.

What about a fuse with a resistor? Kiteman's right that a normal resistor should fix allot of the issue, but you'd want something to really disconnect the equipment to ensure it doesn't fry anything important.
I know that powerlines have something called a decoupling capacitors that perform similar functions to fuses for a normal home. I also know that capacitors are used to filter and screen radiowaves, so it might be more appropriate for what you're doing with your antenna.. just somethings to think about.

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thematthatter

5 years ago

I've only set up one antenna and it had the instructions and parts to ground it.

Your antenna would probably have the same thing since according to Google its the law to ground an antenna.

What you need is called a lightning arrester to prevent the signal from going to ground but will allow the 1.21 Giggawatts to go to ground.

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Kiteman

5 years ago

Maybe put a resistor in the system, between the antenna and the ground?

During normal use, it will stop current flowing to ground, but will be entirely unable to stop lighting following that path.