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Help me connecting capacitors??? Answered

Friends i need help in connecting capacitors to get a burst of current in following cases:-
<i>capacitors of same V but different uF(i know thats not a 'u' but i dont know how to type it)
<ii>capacitors of same V and  uF
<iii>capacitors of different V but same uF.
& also
if you can suggest me a book, article,instructable ect. so i could do it next time on my own. And i know how capacitor works but just want to know how to practically use them.

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anubhavtalukdar007
anubhavtalukdar007

8 years ago

Hello Atul009, Go to this link and download the e-book I think all your questions about electronics will be answered.
The link again-   http://www.talkingelectronics.com/projects/Testing%20Electronic%20Components/Testing%20Components.pdf

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

8 years ago

Connected in series, capacitance adds as 1/C = 1/C1+1/C2+1/C3
Connected in parallel capacitance adds as C = C1+C2+C3

VOLTAGES in series, add, but its a bad idea, in general. unless you add biasing resistors ( put a 10M across each cap)

Voltages in parallel are the same as the cap voltage.

In general, the capacitor maximum voltage should exceed ANY voltage in your circuit

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Atul009
Atul009

Answer 8 years ago

So,
if i connect capacitors in parallel way of 10V
The voltage will remain the same but current would increase...
Ah am i right

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 8 years ago

Current will increase.

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frollard
frollard

Answer 8 years ago

Correct. If they are all rated 10 or more V then you are fine - if they are not, the lower voltage ones will explode while the higher ones will watch and laugh. The capacitance will just linearly add while the voltage will be the same on all.

When working with caps its a good idea to have a 25-50% safety margin, so if they are 16v caps, you don't charge them 'routinely' above 12v, ish.