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How Would You Fix This? Answered

I've watched videos on YouTube about it and have never done body work before. So I'm trying to soak up as much info as I can from as many sources as possible. It's hard to find forums that are updated frequently so that's I'm posting on here. Can anyone suggest how they would go about fixing this type of rust? The more detail the better, thank you.

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rickharris

7 weeks ago

If that is a door pillar then it is structural. At least in the Uk it would need to be welded.

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bbqandbeer

7 weeks ago

If thats an American truck, lmctruck dot com has replacement parts and body panels. If not that route, learn to use lead as a filler like back in the ol' days.

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Downunder35m

7 weeks ago

Don't know what type of car you have but a friend approached my with a similar hole today.
His newly obtained, second hand car turned out to look really good but only for the paint job.
Cracks appeared and it became evident that a lot of the body is actually made up from filler materials instead of metal.
This reminded me of your case here ;)

I assume the body is not really old enough to allow an easy seperation like it was possible on the original VW Beetle.
More modern cars now use glue, silicone like stuff with incredible boning and sealing strength.
But also spot welding instead of screws.
You should still be able to remove doors, bigger panels and such though.
In the end you might have to cheat if the rotten parts can't be removed.
For most cars you can buy repai panles for the most commonly affected areas.
They are designed to be big enough to cover more than what usually rusts away.
Using them as a template you cut out the original to match.
Most come with at least one bend bit that slides under the original to allow for easier alignment and fixing in place.
You can solder these parts or use a welder.
Soldering means you really need to know how to handle a blow torach or have a giant sized soldering iron that is able to heat the steel suffiently.
Welding, especially with a MIG welder allows you to tack the piece in place and then to fill the gaps in short sections to prevent warping.
You can ask in body repair shops where to buy repair panels or order them through them directly if you don't mind the price.
A complex shape like in your pic can also be fixed by welding several pieces together to get the right shape.
Instead of becoming a professional beater you then just need to to minim bending while the final shape is done with the welder and grinder.
Not the nicest way but it works fine as long as you don't care how it looks on the inside.

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Downunder35m

8 weeks ago

Cut it out to the specs of the replacement part.
If none available, cut it out until you reach solid metal and build your own replacement.
With no experience in body works it would be best to team up with someone who at least know how to beat sheet metal to get it into the correct shape.

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seamster

8 weeks ago

The general rule is to remove all the damaged material, all the way back as far as needed till you're left with solid metal to work from. You can replace full panels if needed, or weld in new sections either fabricated from scratch or cut from replacement panels.