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How can I use a digital camera to obtain DSLR looking footage? Answered

I recently bought a new video camera, the Panasonic HC-V750. Don't get me wrong, its an amazing camera and I love it, but I made the mistake of spending 500 bucks on this instead of a DSLR. I am trying to make a short film and want it to look professional. However, I know that this is almost always achieved using a DSLR and nifty editing/lighting techniques. I have the editing and lighting techniques down, but is there any way to adjust my video camera so that I can get DSLR-like quality? Like adjusting shutter or something? I know that the advantages of a DSLR are their large sensors and supreme ability to capture light using these sensors. Can I achieve this, at least a little, with my video camera? I can adjust the white balance, shutter, iris, and focus, on my camera. Any links and/or help is greatly appreciated!

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seandogue
seandogue

6 years ago

Well you could always post-process it using filtersacting on "the product" (rather than or in addition to apply direct filtering to the capture) to achieve anything from daylight ready videos to film noire (sp) to pyschadellia... where are those filters? I'll admit I don't know the direct answer to that (if indeed a question) but I suspect that were I to want to know, a few google search terms like "post processing filters for video" would do the trick. (indeed it does generate quite a few related links, just as I suspected. Perhaps not idealized, but effective even without attempting a second phrase)

Best wishes whichever way you go.

Now, to the question of the day. Paraphrasing, you said that you bought a video camera but should have gotten a DSLR. Are you attempting to create static images using the video camera? If so, you will only have partial success. Vid just isn't a static image and at least imo, you shouldn't expect a 1:1 performance ratio, no matter any filters you apply pre or post process.Filters almost always (if not always) introduce additional noise. In addition, video being what it is, at least as I remember how it works, each frame is only half the picture for most.. Improve your vid skills but I would not expect it to ever perform at the level of a static image capture DSLR.

If these *wire static images, I'd say you could use Photoshop to mod them, or for less outlay, Paint shop Pro,. or for even less (free still afaik) Paint Dot Net (http://www.getpaint.net) but I don't often work with video so I have no choices to poffer in that arena

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Kiteman
Kiteman

6 years ago

I've just looked at the spec of the Panasonic HC-V750 on Amazon - it should produce video that looks as good as anything off a DSLR, possibly better (DSLRs are optimised for stills photography, not video).

The only problem may be the zoom - it's only optical up to x20, so any magnification greater than that will cost you in resolution.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

6 years ago

If you need a (semi) professional camera no point and shoot toy will be a substitude.

But if you have a good quality camera there will be little to no difference to a DSLR model if you do it right.

The main thing is image quality and resolution - both can be obtained with any good cam and the correct lighting.

You might find that with steady movements of the cam there is little difference to be seen compared to DSLR systems.

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-max-
-max-

6 years ago

More light on your subjects will reduce noise in the picture, and when video recording, lower framerates allow more time for the image sensor to gather light, so the noise will average out in a way. 24fps will leave you with a choppy, cinematic view. Some people like it, others prefer higher frame rates, like above 60.

Shooting photo's in RAW format will leave them uncompressed, and unedited, so that post-editing will allow more tweaking ability without as much loss in detail, color, etc. I am not sure if that camera supports that though.

Really though, there is not much that can accommodate a mediocre sensor. If megapixels are not a big deal, then choosing a camera with less of them may lead to better, less grainy pictures, which is counter-intuitive, but here is why: Say the sensor is X size. The more pixels you cram into it, the smaller each pixel has to be. There has to be a certain amount of distance between each pixel, so the smaller you make the pixels, the more dead space there is between them, that does nothing for connecting light. Basicly, higher PPI = smaller pixels = less surface area = nasty quantum effects due to size = grainy!!!