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How to make a magnetically powered/propelled vehicle ? Answered

I'm a freshman in high school doing a Year End Project (YEP) for STEM. My project is a vehicle that is propelled by electromagnetism. I have three main idea's already. Option 1: Completely replace wheels with large magnets with either a North or South charge. Then replace normal roads with railings charged with magnetism of the same polar to the cars. The bumpers could be magnetically charged as well. With all car bumpers being the same polar, it would decrease the chances of accidents. Take into account that this idea has only started growing for the past 2 years so my ideas for the mechanics are not close to completion so I'm leaving those thoughts out. Option 2: keep the wheels but modify them to have 2-3 smaller magnets on the inside of the wheel. By turning and switching on different a polar changing direction between forwards and backwards. Then add the same idea with the bumpers for the same reason. This cuts the cost exponentially. Option 3: Keep the wheels and everything else of a normal automobile except the engine. Replace it with on large magnet that's stationary and a smaller magnet that can rotate or switch between North and South polar's. Possibly instead of only one pair of magnets increase to an unknown number to allow for more speed, braking and acceleration power. Still keep with the bumper idea. I can't seem to find a reason other than cost to get rid of it. Of course the magnets would interfere with electronics. I haven't thought of a solution for that problem as of yet.

Discussions

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rickharris
rickharris

3 years ago

An electric motor is a magnetically powered system. However you seem to have already made some decisions.

Your ideas seem to revolve round a linear electric motor - Google it.

"By turning and switching on different a polar changing direction between forwards and backwards....."

You do a fair job of describing a stepper motor.

At a model size these ideas may have some merit, at full size the weight and strength of the magnets make it impracticable.

You can hover an electromagnet over an aluminium plate.

Professor Eric Laithwait was the father of this type of motor.

Lots to watch here

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=linear+motor+eri...

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 3 years ago

Met Professor Laithwaite, about 2 years before he died.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 3 years ago

Laithwaite died the day my eldest son was born, and my father gave his new grandson a copy of "An engineer in wonderland"

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 3 years ago

One of his best books. I am intrigued by his reference to a vehicle that was sent to him that could propel itself outside it's dimensions without powering the wheels or using jet propulsion. However he doesn't explain it further.

I remember watching the Royal Inst. Christmas lectures he did in the 60's.

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 3 years ago

Envy, for a long time he was my hero and very badly treated by the establishment. I loved the Farady Christmas lectures he did and have 2 of his books, very thought provolking.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

This seems kind of ambitious for a school project, especially if it is the kind of project for which you have to actually build something, or demonstrate something.

If it is the kind of "project" for which all you have to do is, like a slideshow, with some dramatic prose, and some artful illustrations of flying cars, or maybe some pictures ripped from a Google(r) Image search. (Stealing images from Google is definitely the way to go if you're pressed for time, and you need to cobble something together the night before.) Anyway, if it is the kind of deal where you do not have to actually build anything, I think you are well on your way.

In contrast, if your grade for this YEP depends on building some thing, or demonstrating something, some physical principle, I humbly suggest a project that will be easier to build.


Because you seem to be interested in magnetic repulsion, my humble suggestion unto you, it that you build a machine that does something practical, or interesting, with Lenz's Law magnetic repulsion, like separating copper pennies from zinc ones, or separating aluminum cans from plastic bottles.

By the way, the penny separation problem only really makes sense for those of us living in the Former United States, where at the time of this writing, the US 1 cent (=0.01 USD) piece, colloquially called a "penny", is still widely available, in both copper (pre 1983) and zinc (1984 to present) versions. Copper pennies still can be found in pocket change, but in a much smaller fraction than the modern zinc ones. Which is why a machine for separating the copper pennies from the zinc ones could be useful, or at least interesting. I think it would be a fun demo, even if it is not super practical, or profitable.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

Yeah. I forgot about those, the the 1943, "war effort", pennies, made of

zinc-plated steel.

Also I probably should have put a lower bound on that year instead of saying, "pre 1983". Also it turns I quoted the wrong year. The transition from copper pennies to zinc occurred some time in 1982.

Regarding the beginning of the date range for copper pennies, if I can believe the what I read in the official Red Book(r), from Whitman Publishing, pennies consisting of 95% copper by weight, were made in the years:

(1864-1909)

(1909-1958, excluding 1943)

(1959-1982)

The ones made in the years 1864-1909, had a portrait of some nameless person wearing feathered headgear, and those are rarely found in pocket change these days. Informally that nameless person was named, "Indian Head"

The next series, 1909-1958, had a bust of Abraham Lincoln on the front, and two left-right mirrored wheat sheaves on the back.

The next series, 1959-1982, had bust of Abraham Lincoln on the front, and picture of a building, the Lincoln Memorial, on the back.

1982 was the year the US Mint started making pennies out of copper-plated zinc, and almost all the pennies they've made, from then until now, in 2017, were made with the same composition, zinc with copper plating on the outside.

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iceng
iceng

3 years ago

Here is a magnet car going up my fridge,

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

I like it! Moreover, I think that magneticar would look good driving up the side of a steel lamp post. Although, that might be a journey the magneticar would not come back from, if it drove to a height too high to reach and got stuck there.

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iceng
iceng

Answer 3 years ago

Only a dime-store model, a real one would run up and down the golden gate take some water and generate HH power to repeat as long as the bridge stands over water :-)

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

3 years ago

This idea crops up monthly. We answer the same question monthly.

Magnets come in N-S pairs, always. You can't get free energy from a magnet.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

I don't think this one is a the typical free-energy-magik-magnet-motor question. Rather, I think this OP simply wants to build a hovercar.