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How to use a 110 VDC motor plugged into my 110 VAC garage outlets? Answered

I need a bigger motor for my micro lathe project and got one off ebay. its the same motor as on my 7x10 mini lathe but I just realized the motor is 110 VDC and I need it to be 110 VAC. so I can just plug it in to the wall outlet... how do I make it so I can just plug it in and go? Is there some type of wiring trick or some adapter I can use?
Thanks!

Discussions

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iceng

Best Answer 2 years ago

If it is a series motor like Rick points out it can run on AC like the older style drills...

Universal = Series MOTORS because the armature is in series with the field windings... But if they call it a DC it probably works better on a rectified AC like Steve said but size the bridge voltage to be twice your AC line voltage and ten times the nameplate current of your motor... See the 400 volt 25 amp rectifier

http://www.parts-express.com/400v-25a-bridge-recti...

Click on the pic to see all..

motorsaw2.PNG
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zackericeng

Answer 2 years ago

I'm not sure if it's a series motor or not... if it doesn't say it on the motor, how do you tell?

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icengzacker

Answer 2 years ago

Not an easy thing until partially dissembled and viewed.

There is a much simpler way,

1]... IF you can fully remove a single brush and the motor power cord resistance goes to OPEN ie infinite resistance is one of the two signs it is a universal machine.

2]... IF a steel paper clip Does Not stand up against the body of the motor metal frame anywhere around the perimeter suggests, there is no permanent magnet stator and it gets identified as a series universal machine..

To review ; a universal motor has no permanent magnets and any wire dis-connection in the motor opens the resistance to infinity.

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zacker

2 years ago

well i got the motor and its not Universal nor is it AC...lol so now I'm stuck with this motor that i cannot use, well I could save it as a spare for my 7x10 mini lathe because its the same motor. Yes the paper clip stuck straight to the caseing of this one...lol and it looks exactly like the one in the photo iceng attached to his last comment. So next thing now is... can I get something to hook this motor to to make it run off AC? or am I better off just going and finding an AC motor? also whats with the Watts? for some reason I think I need a 250 watt, 110VAC motor to use on a metal late or Small Mill. (Like Sherline size mill) the sherline motor i have doesnt seem to have any real power, i dont know if its just old and wearing down or just not enough power..its 90V...

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zacker

2 years ago

according to the manual for this machine from the grizzly site its a universal motor .

i guess i will wait to get it and do as iceng suggested to test it.

Motors:
Main
Type......................................Universal
Horsepower............................................... 1 HP
Phase.........................................................Single-Phase
Amps..........................................................12A
Speed.........................................................4300 RPM

Power Transfer .........................................Gear Drive
Bearings.....................................................Shielded &Permanently Lubricated

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zacker

2 years ago

supposedly this is the mill this motor is from... http://www.grizzly.com/products/Drill-Mill-with-Stand/G0704

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icengzacker

Answer 2 years ago

IT IS a DC PM Motor for two reasons... You cannot use AC on it.

1]... Picture 1 __ Reversing with two wires is accomplished on a DC motor.

2]... Picture 2 __ That brush length gives an idea of the relative armature size and The frame has no room for a series field windings, it is a permanent magnet..

motor.PNGMOTOR2.PNG
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zackerrickharris

Answer 2 years ago

I'm not sure... the motor is actually off a grizzly milling machine.... but it looks like the same motor used on my harbor freight 7x10 lathe. Now why would they use a DC motor on something that's going to be used on AC ?

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rickharriszacker

Answer 2 years ago

A DC motor would need a pretty strong permanent magnet to make it work.

It is far more likely this is a universal motor ie. one that has the rotor and stator winding's in series.

You will need to investigate further, Test the frame to see if it is strongly magnetic. then do as Iceeng suggests about removing one brush.

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steveastrouk

2 years ago

You can use a bridge rectifier with it, but its probably originally designed to run off a treadmill type motor control, which is very useful on a lathe, since you get some adjustable speed control out of it.