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How would someone create a closet-sized, archival space (temperature controlled etc) in their house for less than $100? Answered

The Detroit Sound Conservancy (@detroitsound and https://www.facebook.com/detroitsoundconservancy) is dedicated to preserving Detroit sounds and telling Detroit stories. To that end we are interested in enhancing and expanding Detroit's archival infrastructure when it comes to sound-related media. While we pursue the creation of our own archival space, we want to encourage our fellow Detroit music lovers in Detroit and around the world to take care of their own archives as well as raise-awareness about the need for archival practices when it comes to music history. So... what recommendations can we make to our allies and friends who might have personal archives and / or materials worth archiving?

We are imagining ephemera (flyers, posters), various printed media (articles, newspapers, magazines), sound recordings (vinyl, cassette, eight track, reel-to-reel), musical instruments, and digital files, amongst many other things.

What do the Instructables recommend? For $100 we may not be able to create a museum-worthy vault in our home. But surely for $100 we can create a space that would hold up to many everyday threats to our musical treasures.

What say you?

Thanks

@detroitsound

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Vyger
Vyger

8 years ago

Thinking about it, there are a few enemies of paper of any kind. The acid in the paper is one of the big ones. Archival paper is acid free. Regular everyday paper has acid in it as a result of the process of making it. I don't know if there is a way of neutralizing it without a high cost. The acid turns the paper yellow and makes it brittle over time.
Insects are another enemy. Some bugs love to eat paper. And mice will shred it to make nests.
And then there is just regular oxygen. It also causes the paper to turn yellow.

What could be a solution? You need a storage unit that can keep vermin out. Water and dampness out (prevents mold). And keep the temperature from getting to high and you want it cheap.

Get an old refrigerator, make sure the door can seal tight and use a small vacuum pump to pump out as much air as possible. It won't help with the acid in the paper but it will keep bugs out, slow the paper from oxidizing. and remove any moisture so mold and mildew can't grow.
You might be able to do it for less than $100. You will probably need to reinforce the door gasket in some way to keep it from getting sucked in. You will have to let the air back in before you can open it. And you can't let the pressure get to low otherwise the fridge will crush inward. With some inventiveness it might work.

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detroitsound
detroitsound

Answer 8 years ago

Thanks @vyger ! This answer has some potential!

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

8 years ago

What temperature ???? What volume ?