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I have 5 rotating led display stands with no power supply, they use battery or power, would like to use power adapter? Answered

The units use 7 flat LED's different colours and are situated in the middle facing up from a rotating mirror, underneath is a compartment for 3 AA battery's, there is also a small hole and pin connector for a power supply, it will only take a very small connector, there is no label that tells me voltage requirements,  My question is: I'm looking for a power adaptor and have no idea what output voltage I should look for, I have never seen a 4.5volt adaptor (referring to 3 AA batteries) I know I will need to take one device with me to find the correct size plug. it is smaller than usual, any ideas would be gratefully received

Discussions

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Josehf Murchison
Josehf Murchison

3 years ago

A 5 volt 250 mA adapter should be fine there are universal adapters with interchangeable heads.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

3 years ago

I had similar lights and a cheap USB charger usually does the trick.
If there nothing noted on the thing about the power requirement use a 2A charger to be on the safe side.
Center pin on your light should be the positive supply voltage, the outside contact negative/ground.
If you want to stay closer to the 4.5V as supplied from batteries you put a diode in series with the supply and it drops by about 0.7V.

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seandogue
seandogue

Answer 3 years ago

+1

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seandogue
seandogue

3 years ago

A 5V supply and a 1N4001 diode in series will bring you to roughly the value it expects from three AAA batteries. Based on your photo, the connector required appears to be a 1.3mm dc power plug.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

It turns out that you are in a better position for to discover the secrets of that gizmo, than are the gurus who read and answer questions on this forum.

The reason why this is true, is all you have to do is to take it apart, and you, dear DIYer, can discover its secrets!

You can discover which wire goes where, and if you know how to use a multimeter, and a few other tools like wires, aligator clips, maybe a soldering iron, you can discover its electrical secrets too, like for example, how much current (in amperes or milliamperes) it uses, when attached to a voltage source. Be that voltage source either 3x AA cells in series, or a 5 volt USB charger, or phone charger, or 5 volt DC supply in series with a rectifier diode or two, in the manner explained in Downunder35m's answer.

Those coaxial power connectors,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coaxial_power_connec...
are kind of troublesome simply because they come in so many different sizes.

You know, if you don't absolutely need it to look pretty, you can just pull out that Cinderella connector, or alternately just leave it where it is and solder some wires in parallel with it, for to connect to something more common, like maybe, blade connectors,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_connector...

a pin header connector, screw terminals, or even bare wires and alligator clips, if you had to.

And it might come to that, if that Cinderella coaxial plug turns out to be pricey, or unavailable, or both, in your local parts-market.