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I have a Toyota conquest 1.6, 16 valve, 2002 model. My car is loosing compression. Please help? Answered

I have a Toyota conquest 1.6, 16 valve, 2002 model. I have changed the fuel filter, changed the oil, bougi cords, ball joints, brake pads and the spark plugs. Last year October i put in a new clutch plate, pressure plate and trust bearings plus a new head gasket. The fuel filter and air filter is clean. My car is losing compression. One mechanic says my clutch plate is gone, one mechanic says the flywheel has either shifted or needs to be skimmed and the other mechanic says its my rings and bearings. What is the problem and how can it be fixed?

Discussions

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Quadrifoglio

2 years ago

the car is far more sluggish, shudders very bad uphill,

From your further description, I can see how mechanics would have gone with clutch / flywheel or with compression. I am going to confuse the issue further by suggesting that it may be valve timing. This happens due either to a stretched timing belt or a bad Toyota VVT module (Variable Valve Timing). It can also happen when reassembling an engine but that isn’t the case here.

I know some Toyota 1.6L 16v engines came with VVT, but I don’t know about yours specifically.

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Josehf Murchison

2 years ago

OK I am assuming you mean cylinder compression.

Do you have a compression tester?

If you do, run your engine until it is warm and then do a compression test and record the values. Should be over well over 125 psi on every cylinder and no more than 10 to 20 psi different the engine is good.

Next put a tablespoon of oil in the cylinders one at a time as you compression test each cylinder and record the values.

If the compression goes up on the second test, it is the bottom end and you need an engine rebuild. (rings, bearings, ma be even the flywheel and clutch plate)

If the compression values remain the same as the first test and the values are off it is the top end. (head, valves, cam, head gasket)

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ArupaAJosehf Murchison

Answer 2 years ago

Hi''You see, i changed the head gasket, put in new plug seals from toyota.

Today, the car is far more sluggish, shudders very bad uphill, even on a straight road, there's not much power. The fastest it can go is 70km/hr. I don't force my car to go fast in case something happens. At 2 uphills, even in first gear, my car didn't want to move.

When i change the rings and bearings, do i also have to change the oil filter, air filter, cam belt, fan belt?

I don't have a compression tester.

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ArupaAArupaA

Answer 2 years ago

Las night was about 3 deg.

normally when its colder, i have no problem with my car

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Josehf MurchisonArupaA

Answer 2 years ago

Now that is interesting.

How is your thermostat?

If your engine is hot or over heating it can warp the head.

You said you replaced the head gasket, Why?

The head gasket is not a normal tuneup repair, most mechanics wont touch a head gasket unless it is blown.

How was the head gasket blown,ie warped head, damaged by over heating, blew out the cooling system or coolant in the oil.

If the head was warped when you replaced the head gasket, did you get the head planed, or did the mechanic think he could get away with just replacing the gasket.

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Josehf Murchisonsteveastrouk

Answer 2 years ago

Steve if you are going to disassemble the engine block to replace rings and bearings replacing all the seals, gaskets, timing belt, oil, and oil filter, is part of the job, so is a complete tuneup. After spending about $2500.oo on the engine, wouldn't you want an engine you don't need to look at for a long time.

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Josehf MurchisonArupaA

Answer 2 years ago

How cold is it right now where you live?

Without a compression tester your only choice is the mechanics advice oil filter and all.

I have run into symptoms like yours on an old ford, after the head gasket was replaced the air warmer off the exhaust manifold fell off and it acted just as you described in cold weather.

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iceng

2 years ago

You have been very loving to your car.

I agree with Quadrifoglio and Vyger

In my old Chevy days I fixed low compression with 'thick oil for worn engines'

It took 20 minutes to flow into the oil spout in summer. I don't remember the name, but in three treatments it built up a varnish like filler in the piston walls that cut my burning oil by a factor of four..

Maybe something like the 40-70

https://www.autobarn.com.au/nulon-40-70-extra-thic...

could do the same for your engine... Do check if Toyota approves.

.

Drop the mechanics that think a clutch or flywheel affects compression as Downunder notes.

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Quadrifoglioiceng

Answer 2 years ago

In the day, it was STP, aka engine honey. I hated the stuff because when the engine finally quit, it was a pain to get it off of everything to do a rebuild. But it was a cheap way to get a few more miles out of a engine. Currently there is a product called Motor Honey. A few million of us would like royalties.

You could always tell a honeyed engine by dipping the tip of a flat screwdriver into the oil and pinching the tip between thumb and forefinger. If it was honeyed, you couldn't hold it. Also, honeyed oil told you it was a significantly troubled engine.

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Quadrifoglio

2 years ago

If it is a compression problem, the clutch and flywheel are not involved. Rings and valves are normally what are involved. The following link will walk you through compression testing for a Toyota 1.6L engine.

http://troubleshootmyvehicle.com/toyota/1.6L/how-t...

The key part is the wet versus dry test to determine if the problem is rings versus valves.

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VygerQuadrifoglio

Answer 2 years ago

+1

If you changed the head gasket properly then the only other reason for loss of compression would be the valves or the rings or both.

It is also possible that you didn't torque the head properly when you reinstalled it and it has warped. But that would show up with the symptoms of a bad head gasket.

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Downunder35m

2 years ago

By using a proper mechanic that actually knows what he is talking about.
You do not seriouslyexpect that there is a remote fix or that someone here can diagnose the problem with his crystal ball....
Don't really understand how clutch and compression are related anyway....