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I have a record player with a broken cassette deck, I want to add an aux port. Answered

I have an older Prolectrix record player with CD and cassette. The amp itself seems to incorporate the cd and radio. The cassette seems to cut into the amplifier circuit when one is inserted into the deck via a micro switch.  

I have managed to remove the cassette module with all it's wiring, it was plugged straight into the board via a header plug.

I was considering using a module such as this, as it would fit in the existing hole quite nicely. I haven't tested voltages as yet.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Car-LED-Bluetooth-MP3-WMA-Decoder-Board-Audio-Module-12V-USB-TF-FM-Radio-/191840721438?hash=item2caa991a1e:g:QOYAAOSwyQtVgyA7

3.5mm is fine, or stereo phono is also usable.

I need some advice as to which wires I can use as an input. Obviously there are two power wires to the motor.

The microswitch has 3 wires, red, black and yellow, then you have the three more going to the play head.


Any ideas please? My electronics knowledge is quite basic.

Here's a picture of the turntable in case you know it.

http://blog.garage.me/en/carldotyoung/prolectrix-wooden-retro-turntable-3

Discussions

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Jack A Lopez

Best Answer 3 years ago

Aux? I know the aux. The aux is a member of family bovidae, yes?

Well, supposing you have a source of line level audio,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_level

like a battery powered mp3 player, or something like this, something that has a headphone jack, and also supposing you have a 10 Kohm or 1 Kohm resistor, maybe you could make a tool for injecting audio signal into things, and then you could use this tool to sort of poke at different wires and put audio signal on them, for to discover the place where your amplifier is listening for audio signals.

For example, this thing you call "ply head" sounds promising, although I am not sure what kind of animal a "ply" is.

Maybe something from order diptera?

I will up a picture for you, if what I have said is unclear.

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dancmarshJack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

Apologies, I was typing when tired on a tablet pc. Bad idea.

I nearly flew off the handle at your comment, but re-reading this morning, there was some useful input. You are forgiven.

The biggest problem is the fact that the cassette has no controls from the amp, it seems to just cut in when a microswitch is closed with the physical insertion of a cassette.

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Jack A Lopezdancmarsh

Answer 3 years ago

I suggest replacing the microswitch, with a switch that is maybe more convenient for the way you want to use this amplifier.

I am guessing the microswitch is a single pole, double throw, (SPDT) kind of switch. You said it had three wires.

What I am saying is if you replaced that switch with a kind of switch that stays switched, like a rocker switch, or slide switch, then that new switch could serve as, what-you-call "control", i.e. as the means to signal to the amplifier that it should listen for its audio signal on the wires that used to carry audio from the tape player.

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dancmarshJack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

For some bizarre reason I can't select best answer on your comment. Your theories are aligning with mine. Thanks a lot

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rickharris

3 years ago

Your cassette deck will some where have a lead connecting the audio to the amplifier. If you can find this you can take it to a socket and use the cassette input as an AUX. - probably - bearing in mind I can't see your record player.