78Views7Replies

Author Options:

I want to buy a 3D Printer Answered

I have between a grand and two grand to buy a 3D Printer. What is the best 3D printer with preferably an enclosed body and definitely a larger than 12 in by 12 in by 12 in build area. It must not be resin and the cheaper the better with the best reviews the better

Discussions

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

6 weeks ago

But what every you do, DONT BUY MAKERBOT. They suck. More than you think they do

0
Cheesey125
Cheesey125

6 weeks ago

PRUSA all the way

0
Crazjtk
Crazjtk

7 weeks ago

Do you mind doing a little bit of assembly yourself? Creality’s Cr-10 S5 would be more than large enough at nearly 20x20x20, but you do have to do a little bit of assembly. It also doesn’t have an enclosure, but you could make one pretty easily out of acrylic sheet, MDF board, heck some people use a cardboard box. The good news it that the printer only runs about $720, so you have plenty of money left over for any mods or upgrades you want to make. Creality’s printers have a really strong community, so there are a lot of good resources for any fixes or tweaks you want to make.

0
PhatRATTY
PhatRATTY

Reply 7 weeks ago

What do you think about the makergear m3 and m2?

0
Crazjtk
Crazjtk

Reply 7 weeks ago

Those both appear to be smaller than you were looking for, and for the difference in price, they don’t really appear to offer anything you couldn’t do yourself for WAY less than that cost.

0
PhatRATTY
PhatRATTY

Reply 7 weeks ago

I assume you own the Creality Cr-10. Does it come with a hardened steel nozzle? Or stainless steal? What filaments have you used successfully with it?

0
Crazjtk
Crazjtk

Reply 7 weeks ago

I personally own Creality’s Ender 3 Pro. It’s a similar machine only smaller. (And even cheaper) Creality’s machines ship with brass nozzles, but plated tool steel nozzles are cheap and readily available, as are ones of different sizes for faster material output.
I’ve used PLA, but if you put an enclosure around it to regulate temperature better, Creality’s printers can handle ABS and other popular materials reasonably. It’s a Bowden style extruder, and not an all-metal hot end, so flexible materials are a bit more of a challenge, and higher temp materials are out. There’s a wealth of knowledge on forums and usergroups. Both of those shortcomings can be remedied with a direct drive setup and all metal hot end swap.

0
Downunder35m
Downunder35m

7 weeks ago

Well, I've been down that route...
Needed a printer for some huge parts back in the day, so I build an oversized Prusa myself.
Did the job in the end but....
Once you go over the standard sizes that for example a Flashforge Inventor offers, things get costly really quickly.
For example finding a heated bed of that size is not easy and requires a massive power supply.
Mechanics are also limited, especially in terms of supporting weight.
Smooth rail would need to bigger, frame stronger....
And all this can mess with the overall accuracy.

A thing many newbies try to ignore is the time it takes to print something that actually requires such a big printer.
In most cases you would want a 0.7mm nozzle and not a 0.4mm or finer just to cut off some hours of the build time.
A very detailed object that fits into a 15x15x15cm build volume can already take you a day to print...
Any little problem while it is printing can mean a totally ruined print - another downside of going big if you ask me.
I highly doubt that you get a quality machine of your desired size on your budget.
No problem though getting a really nice one in standard size....