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I'm from the UK; can someone please explain how old "x graders" are so I can understand their level of learning? Thanks! Answered

as Q,please

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Best Answer 10 years ago

Since an American child starts school at 6 years old, first grade is 6 years old. I think the final grade is 12, or 18 years. Steve

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kevinhannan
kevinhannan

Answer 10 years ago

Thanks - what does the child do before 6? Kindergarten? Is that compulsory?

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Answer 10 years ago

Kindergarten is compulsory in U.S. public (see Gorfam's excellent analysis) schools, so children start at age 5 in "grade 0" (if you like C++ notation :-).

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jtobako
jtobako

Answer 10 years ago

Depends on where you are. It's not compulsory in all areas.

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Grathio
Grathio

Answer 10 years ago

Plenty of parents in the US also send their kids to "preschool" which is not compulsory, and attendance depends greatly on region and affluence. But it comes before kindergarten, age 4 or so. (I have not idea what they teach there since kindergarten assumes you're starting from zero. I always assumed it was simply a more expensive and less guilt-inducing version of day care.)

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Gorfram
Gorfram

Answer 10 years ago

Daycare is mostly just about about providing the kids a safe & supervised place to be. Pre-school actually attempts to prepare the kids for kindergarten and for school in general, using stuff like letter and number recognition games, cooperative activities (to teach cooperation), storytime (mostly just helps teach sitting still in a group, but that's an important skill to have at any age :). (Google "Early Childhood Education" to find any amount of information on why this is either a good idea, an extremely good idea, or Your Child's Best Hope For Future Success and Happiness. :)

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Gorfram
Gorfram

10 years ago

In general:
Age = Grade Level + 5

1st graders are usually about 6, 5th graders are 10 or so, 9th graders are around 14, etc. Add "+/- 1" to the above equation to account for variations like birthdays being out of phase with the school year.

Free public* education ends on completion of 12th grade, the last year of High School. Attendance is required by law only up to the age of 16, so "High School Drop-outs" have usually completed the 10th, or sometimes the 11th grade.

(*Note: government-provided schools free to any legally resident child are called "public schools" in the US. Privately-run schools open only to students who are accepted for admission and whose family can pay a tuition ranging from about $5,000 to $50,000 (or more) per year are called "private schools."... Two great countries, still separated by a common language. :)

While we're at it: what's a "Sixth Former," and are they the ones who are forever worried about their "A-Levels"?
And when Kitemen was "Head of Year", had he had to slowly work his way up from "Head of Week" to "Head of Fortnight," and then "Head of Month"? ;)

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 10 years ago

Correct statutory education in the UK is age 5 to age 16. after that students are volunteers. they can stay on for 2 more years to do higher level education to prepare them for university at 18.

Head of year follows many many years of grovelling and doing the dirty jobs to get to do the good ones. 5 year old = year 1 6 yr 2 7 yr 3 etc so at 10/11 yr 6 they move up to secondary school and into yr 7 up to yr 13.

In most - but not all schools there is a head of year for each year responsible for discipline and organisation of that year.

My school had learning leaders instead. I was a head of department.

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jtobako
jtobako

Answer 10 years ago

Minnesota has a voucher program, where the public funds available per student can be transferred to a private school or 'charter school' where a particular focus such as culture or ability can be emphasized.

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Gorfram
Gorfram

Answer 10 years ago

As do several other US states, I believe. Voucher programs, charter schools and "magnet" programs are somewhat blurring the lines between private and public education in the US. Political opinions about whether this is a good idea differ quite a bit. My note on what's known as a "public school" in the US was aimed towards the Brits. My understanding is that in the UK, the places where admission depends on academic qualifications, ability to pay substantial tuition/fees, and sometimes having ancestors among the alumni are called "Public Schools;" whilee places where everybody and his gardener can enroll their children (for free?) are simply called "schools." (A "private school" seems to be a tutor presiding over a small classroom within some stately home, for the benefit of the children of the (usually richly titled) family.)

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Answer 10 years ago

"Sixth former" is a throwback to the old nomenclature. Technically, they are Year12 and Year 13, the last two years of pre-university education, and , yes, they are the ones who worry about their A levels. The A of A level stands for Advanced, as opposed to O ("Ordinary") levels, which are no longer used in UK school. Pupils now sit GCSEs at age 16. Unfortunately, neither GCSEs nor A levels have the value they once had - 20+ years of "improved" results have shown that they are getting easier. (Oh, and before I was HoY, I was a Form Tutor. HoY is the pastoral line manager of form tutors. I am in charge of the pastoral car of a year-group - that is, all those children of the same cohort (Yr8 are all 12-13 years old))

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kevinhannan
kevinhannan

10 years ago

Exams across the board have become easier, including degree's, but not - I am assured - Doctorates (PhD). The fact that I have 2 degree's goes some way to proving how easy they are.

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seandogue
seandogue

Answer 10 years ago

I guess it might be considered splitting hairs, but speaking as an American...

(technically, American children start school at age 5, not 6. The term Kindergarden is used for the introductory year, and although historically only a half-day program, in many, if not most American cities, it has been transformed to a full day and now actually teaches more than the ABCs and tying one's shoes) The grade markers are now just a convention rather than an accurate measure of when a child actually starts school.

We've had full day "kindergarden" in my community for nearly 20 years now and children learn to read, do simple math and all of the traditional activities that kindergarten brought to bear..

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jtobako
jtobako

Answer 10 years ago

Due to social advancement, grade is indication of age, not scholastic ability. Age at start can be 5 or 6, depending on what month the child is born and if the parents consider competitive sports important (in which case they hold their child back as long as possible so that the child is physically larger). Half day or full day kindergarden depends on local funding.

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seandogue
seandogue

Answer 10 years ago

true on age...for the most part though, the age is 5...as I recall it only affects a small window of births...(my parents were given a choice with me, as I was born in early August and was on the cusp. They chose to send me at 5.) I hadn't thought about the faux military angle though.

Half day still exists, but afaik it's slowly going the way of the 1900s, in part due to the need for child care with the increased ?need? ?greed? for dual-income households during the last couple decades (everyone needs a pair of BMWs, a 3500sq ft home in what was fertile farmland 25 miles outside the city, and a 50 inch flatscreen don't they?) and the demand by business people and wall street for 24/7 productivity that has taken control of the whole world economy. Children, after all, should be prepared to work by the age of ten, even if the law says they can't... yet. (laws can, after all, always be changed while no-one's looking)

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 10 years ago

Two degrees and you can still misuse an apostrophe! (What subjects?) L

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kevinhannan
kevinhannan

Answer 10 years ago

Wouldn't you believe it? When young I got so much stick for being 'clever' and now I've gotten a bit older I get stick for not being clever enough! lol! It all comes down to this: my main laptop bust and I have this tiny, tiny netbook (7" screen) with an even tinier keyboard, so when I press the wrong key or whatever I just let it go. I also find that dumbing down also helps, as it makes my replies more 'acceptable' to the majority who read it and it helps me to be not quite so anal about my own work. There have been years where I would have agonised where it was best to shave off 0.5mm off a piece of wood. In short, yes, I have my degree's but "c'est la vie" !

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 10 years ago

Thanks for the details, good university? (I mean loctaionwise good) L

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kevinhannan
kevinhannan

Answer 10 years ago

Business Admin (Hons) 2:2 MA Social Work

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kevinhannan
kevinhannan

10 years ago

Many thanks to all; I'm glad I got that sorted out - it's bugged me for a while.