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Increase running speed Answered

I don't run very much. I never was all that good at it. Lately, though, I have found the need to improve that ability, specifically my endurance at speed. I can slowly jog a mile, sure, but haulin'-ass-away-from-an-amgry-man-with-a-knife-speeds don't last much longer than thirty yards, if that. I'd like to improve my overall speed if possible, and especially increase the distance that I can cover flat-out before I keel over. I'm not going to be running a marathon anytime soon, but I'd like to be able to get farther than average, as fast as possible, on demand. Any tips for training or proper form? I live at roughly 5400 feet, but I'm just a short drive away from 14,000-foot peaks. I would also like to improve my off-the-line times--in other words, acceleration. If I were to need to run between ten and twenty-five yards, I can do that at my top speed as is, but that speed is not as fast as it could be. I'm generally not even up to full speed until eight or ten yards past the line. Suggestions?

Discussions

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Rishnai

Reply 10 years ago

"Run more." I kinda figured that, but I'm looking for tips on how to do it in such a way that I'll get as much benefit as possible, especially over a short timespan. Thanks though.

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WeissensteinburgRishnai

Reply 10 years ago

For optimal benefit, push yourself harder. It sounds simple...because it is. The more you work, the more you improve.

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churchmanWeissensteinburg

Reply 8 years ago

This is the end of the page ! down go please past the point of no return!

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Kiteman

10 years ago

How about following a proper training schedule, like this one.

Many years ago, when marathons and half-marathons started getting popular, my father and I started following the training programme for the first Great North Run. We didn't run the race, we just wanted to get fit.

We ended up being able to do 8-minute miles cross-country.

However, when I found myself running a cross-country half marathon on my eighteenth birthday, I decided enough was enough, and I've barely run since - my cross-country miles are now about 20 minutes' stroll.

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thematthatter

10 years ago

my times are about 15 minutes for 2 mile. not terrible fast but decent. a way to improve your run speed is to alternate sprinting and speed walking. we do something at work where its 60/120, you sprint as hard as your little legs will carry you for 1 minute and speed walk the other two. also to build up stamina is to run run run, i normally run about 2 1/2 or so miles every morning (not by choice) another thing, if you got a person who runs a bit faster than you then run with them and try to stick up with them. also hydration is the key, dont expect to run your best if you been out drinking the night before. grab you some water and gatorade and sip on that the night before. i known people who have gotten IVs the night before a big run.

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Rishnaithematthatter

Reply 10 years ago

You run twice as fast as I do, 15 minutes in the mile is my record! I like your 60/120 method. I'll get on that right away. My current method of pushing myself to run just a bit faster is to chase after a friend on a dirtbike as he goes around my yard trying to go as slow as he can without putting his foot down. I can catch him in second gear, but not quite third yet.

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churchmanRishnai

Reply 8 years ago

Also with the acseption that is i even walk faster than five miles per hour for less than a min I get a killer killer killer killer killer cramp in my side!! ya I'v got issuses with my sides! and lungs! funny tho I can hold my breath normaly for over 2 minutes!

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churchmanRishnai

Reply 8 years ago

I can run faster than A ten speed bike with a person riding downhill while i am going on a strait road!

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thematthatterRishnai

Reply 10 years ago

15 min for one mile, Are you walking any? Even if you have to slow down to a light jog, you should still at least be able to do 10 min mile.

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Rishnaithematthatter

Reply 10 years ago

I'm pretty sure I could go faster, if properly motivated. If there had been official timekeeping a few times when I was being chased by a girl's father... Perhaps it's a pacing issue. I'm trying to break the habit of sprinting to near exhaustion and then slowing down to a jog/walk. I'll try doing a light jog for a mile to see if my time improves.

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=SMART=

10 years ago

Ah me to !, im not "un-fit" or fat i just haven't done sport for ages.I cant find any sports that interest me :(

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churchman=SMART=

Reply 8 years ago

Me nether! lad I am more a sience freak lolz

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guyfrom7up

10 years ago

I'd say just practice. I don't have a real good judgement of how fast i am, cause most of my friends are insanely fast, like Usain Bolt fast (lol), I'd say I'm a bit faster than average. I can't run real long distances (I have a tough time completing a 5k), but I blame it on asthma, ha.

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churchmanguyfrom7up

Reply 8 years ago

My friend think that to lol!
I beat an 8th grader with sortstuby arms when I was 6 years old I can run up to 18 miles per hour ! only for to-and -back across a regular gym then I need to slow down by 2 miles per sec! lolz for 3 secs

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zascecs

8 years ago

If all else fails, steroids should do the trick... =P

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whiteoakart

8 years ago

I am a self-coached 5k runner and triathlete. I am also involved in martial arts. My PR for 5K is sub-16 minutes for reference. I am no elite athlete, but I am fast enough to have won a lot of races. It sounds like you want to improve initial acceleration from zero to top speed. Yes? If that is the case, you need to build up leg strength, not endurance. Intervals will probably not do it for you either, although they will make you faster overall. Massively quick acceleration (like Usain Bolt or in my day, Carl Lewis) comes from explosive power from quick twitch muscles. Here are a few ways to strengthen these muscles without fancy equipment. Do these exercises a couple of times a week. Warm up first and quit when you get tired. Doing these exercises when you are tired is a good way to get a hamstring pull, which is no fun at all and will not help your running. I will have to leave it to you to decide how much is appropriate. It is good if your legs are achey the next day. It is too much if your knees swell up like grapefruits. 1. Standing long jump. Stand with both feet together, squat and jump as far forward as you can. Mark your landing spot. Next time aim to beat your mark. Landing on soft sand is ideal, but at least aim to land on some kind of cushioned surface for your knees' sake. 2. Stationary high jump. Stand with feet together next to a wall, facing the wall, with a china marker or chalk in your hand. Jump straight up and stretch up marking the wall as high as possible. Next time, beat that. Again, it helps to do this outside on a lawn (you could mark a tree with a white china marker) or on a padded floor for the benefit of your knees. 3. If you have access to a gym with machines, use the leg press. Do five quick presses with a weight that is difficult to do ten reps. Then stop. If you are up to it, you can do another set after stretching, but don't over-do it. Over time you will be able to see your leg strength improving by your advancing marks and weight limits (on the machine). I do these exercises to improve my ability to do jumping kicks in martial arts. I am kind of short at 5'6" and I often have to spar with people 6 to 8 inches taller than me. You get three points for kicking someone in the head (as opposed to 1 point for a kick to the mid-section), so that is my goal, but as Jet Li says in "The Expendables", "I'm small, so I have to work harder."

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AnarchistAsian

10 years ago

for me, i just run, then sprint as far i can, until i don't want to feel that much pain anymore. then i continue jogging... sometimes you just have to ignore the pain. of course if you just want to be super-fast, then just do leg excercises. build muscle, but don't get in-over your head... my knees are messed up because i tried hiking too far with a heavy backpack. now i need physical therapy... OR you could just hop on one of your bikes.

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RishnaiAnarchistAsian

Reply 10 years ago

Aye, that's the rub, no motorbikes allowed on the rugby pitch.

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Goodhart

10 years ago

Way back when I was in high school, I could not go beyond a 220 meter run. My lung capacity was always a bit slacking, but I could tear up the track at 100 yards or less. :-)

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killerjackalope

10 years ago

Hum, occasionally, maybe once a year I'll do a run, then again I am not fond of running because it's hard on your knees, mine being in rough shape means I'll stick to cycling but the last time I did a mile flat out was based on a combination of adrenaline and a disturbingly buff dad with a bat. So far they're all right though, the matthatters technique sounds good. General fitness does determine run time so other exercise isn't a bad idea.

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jessyratfink

10 years ago

Interval training and sprints will probably be the best way. That's always what I hear recommended. :)

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NachoMahma

10 years ago

. Warm up properly (primarily stretching). Practice, practice, practice. Cool down properly (slow jog or fast walk for a few minutes). The more you run, the more you can run. It's really just a matter of slowly building your conditioning and endurance - no quick way to do it. . For what you are wanting, high-altitude training is probably not necessary, but it will increase lung/heart capacity, which will help. . A site dedicated to running would probably be a better place to ask.

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Weissensteinburg

10 years ago

Run more. I've taken it up recently...doing my fourth 5k this weekend. Eat well and exercise...that's really all there is to it.

Well, you could put springs on all your shoes.