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Inefficient, Complicated, Slow Data Transfer Idea w/ Geek points! Answered

Would it be possible to transfer data between two computers at the same time using a single large optical disc? One laser would write to the disc while the other would read it when the disc rotates around. Maybe a magnetic disk like in a zipdisk would work better? An alternative to a disk might be using magnetic tape. I've had this idea for a while and now I've finally illustrated it, Is this at all possible? Also, why when I upload pictures to my library Instructables craps the quality and turns them into smuddgy blurs?

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PKM

10 years ago

One laser would write to the disc while the other would read it when the disc rotates around.
AFAIK writable discs aren't a great medium for this idea, you can only rewrite them so many times.

Maybe a magnetic disk like in a zipdisk would work better? An alternative to a disk might be using magnetic tape.
That's much more doable. I'm not sure exactly why you would want to, however, as you could just plug the read/write heads together and have... a cable. If you wanted to do it for cool points, that would be another matter.

I've wanted to create a device with a network cable plug and a laser/photoreceptor pair for a long time- you could plug one into each of a pair of computers and have a "wireless" link that acts like a network cable. It would only work over line of sight, but it would be slow, inefficient and cool.

Also, why when I upload pictures to my library Instructables craps the quality and turns them into smuddgy blurs?
The site turns the images you upload into JPEGs for efficiency. Images with lots of detail and sharp edges don't make great JPEGs. You can possibly slightly game the system by uploading larger images, which are presumably encoded as JPEGs at full size and then shrunk in your browser so might have better quality.

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lemonie

10 years ago

I'd like you to send weeks/months doing this for the sake of seeing it done.
You've got to appreciate first that you can't have two devices fighting over the same drive, start thinking about a tape archive, visuallise the disk a magnetic-tape and you might be off to a start. The largest part of this (excepting completely rebuilding the optical data-readers, software and everything) is coordinating them around the same disc.

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Marble of Doomlemonie

Reply 10 years ago

Adapting two disk drive would definitely daunting task. A small scale test with cassette recorders would probably be a good place to start as large tape drives run in the $200 - $3,000 range. I have a busy schedule but I'm hoping I can work on this project soon!

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lemonieMarble of Doom

Reply 10 years ago

I only meant to think tape-drive. If you're reading data at a fixed rate (over which the burner has control) you've got to read a data-stream and take it as it comes - you can't go back and re-read a "scratched" / corrupt section.

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