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Is it possible to store a living human/animal for years at a very low temperature and recover him back alive? Answered

They do it with plants, and it has been successful in some cases. They do it with animal limbs, so is it possible to do that with a whole human and recover him back alive after years, to find that he/she hasn't aged? 

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canucksgirl

Best Answer 7 years ago

The answer is yes and no.

Yes, you can store a human for years at very low temperatures with the goal of recovering the person back to life. This process is called Cryonics.

There is a company called Alcor that does just that. They "preserve human life with the intent of restoring good health when technology becomes available to do so."

That's the NO part. There is no technology currently available to "defrost" cryogenically frozen humans with any ability of "restoring good health".

So, it may be possible one day. Just not today.

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ankur2893canucksgirl

Answer 7 years ago

yeah, i was doing a project on cryonics that's why i asked!! thanks

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Johenix

7 years ago

You ask two interesting questions at once.
1.) Can a non hibernating mamal be placed in a state of suspended animation?

Answer: Researchers have found that toxic (more poisonous than cyanide) hydrogen sulphide (H2S) at about 8ppm in an oxygen atmosphere can put a rat in a state of suspended annimation for indefinate periods of time. Revival is done by putting the rat in normal air for half an hour to an hour.
(Rats in a jar for feeding your pet snakes anyone?)

Further research is being done on using sodium sulphide (Na2S) as a life suspender/extender for extreme trauma patients.

2.) You can not yet freeze a rat, but if you had him sulphide suspended in a jar, you could put the jar in the refrigerator.

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mikeasaurus

7 years ago

I'm no scientist, but I've heard that freezing human cells causes them to burst; like how water expands when it's frozen. So though we can freeze humans, and thought they look 'normal', their cells have exploded and reanimating them (specifically) hasn't been figured out yet (to the best of our knowledge).

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rickharrismikeasaurus

Answer 7 years ago

Human sperm and eggs are routinely frozen and remain viable for years.

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astroboy907

7 years ago

Planning to do this to a friend? ;-)
sorry, couldn't resist the opportunity...

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seandogue

7 years ago

No, not at this time.

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rickharris

7 years ago

Lower level life forms have been shown to withstand prolonged freezing, Spores, Invertebrates etc but no higher life forms.

Some amphibians can "hibernate" for many months/years in the absence of water,.

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steveastrouk

7 years ago

Possibly, in the distant future. The fairly recent discovery of methods to induce "vitrification" when freezing have helped eliminate crystallisation damage in specimens, but AFAIK the chemicals for vitrification are not compatible with life.

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Vyger

7 years ago

No.
Some animal cells and plant cells have the ability to survive freezing, most do not.There has been a large amount of research into this and it is something that has been sought after for a long time. But the problems are pretty hard to overcome.
First , many of the cells and plants and animals that survive freezing have a type of natural antifreeze in them. So the don't really freeze. When the do finally get too cold and do freeze then they are destroyed. So some plants that appear to survive at first are just extending their temperature range. They are not actually being preserved by freezing.
The really big problem is that water crystallizes when it freezes. When this happens it destroys the chemical compounds in the cells and will even cause the cell walls to rupture. When you thaw meat after its been frozen it leaks fluid. This fluid is the inside cytoplasm of the cells that have ruptured. So the expansion and crystallizing of the water destroys the delicate chemical processes and the structure of the cells. The ones that actually can survive have specific mechanisms that help minimize the damage.
Humans have no such safeties in place in their cells. To accomplish freezing with no damage it would require a rewriting of the cellular structure of humans. Not something that anyone has even been able to understand, much less do. The majority of the research has been directed at trying to change the way the water freezes so its not as destructive. Again not very successful. In addition, to work it would require replacing all the water in a body with a special kind that does not freeze the same way. And that also is something that no one has a clue as to how to do. Its like trying to figure out how to keep a glass jar from breaking when it freezes when its full to the top with water. It is the nature of water to expand when it freezes, there is just no way around it.