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LED CURCUIT Answered


Hello,

 I do not know very much about electronics in general but I would like to make a circuit that allows me to run a group of " LED "  lights, maybe ( 6 to 8  ) in PARALLEL.  I would also like to do the same for hand held " Lasers "  ( 3 to 4 ) in PARALLEL. To make it more complicated, I would like to be able to use the same power source to run both groups at the same time. I would like to be able to turn either group on or off independently while using the same power source. The power source will either be --2  D cell -- or -- 4 AA -- batteries. Normally each LED uses 3 hearing aid batteries. This is the same for each LASER pointer. I think each hearing aid battery is about 1.5 volts but Im not sure what the amperage is. I would like to do it as simple as possible. I hope I can get all of the parts at Radio Shack. I have no idea where to start, any help would be appreciated !

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

10 years ago

You could delete one of your topics which is a double post.

Put LED or LED circuit in the search box above. It will list out many instructables on using LEDs and you might see the LED guide, LED circuits for beginners. Good luck.

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I Need To Know
I Need To Know

Reply 10 years ago

Thanks for the help ---- sorry about the double post. I typed in LED and about one and a half hours and maybe 30 instructables later I was over in rockets. I need to focus !

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

Reply 10 years ago

haha, it kinda happens that way. Have fun.

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I Need To Know
I Need To Know

Reply 10 years ago

Well at this point I'm using misc. junk LED's so I don't know what the specs are. This makes it hard to calculate what size resister to use. So I decided to take apart the penlights that the LED's came in. To my SURPRISE no resister !!!!! What I'm thinking is if the battery's are around 1.5 volt (say 3 hearing aid battery's or 2- D cell, or 3 AA 's ) You don't need a resister because the voltage or amperage is never beyond what the LED's can handle, that is as long as you run them in parallel. I have also noticed that whatever combination of battery's are used for the LED's the voltage is kept around 4.5 volts by the manufacturer.

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

Reply 10 years ago

Yup, life is like a box of electronic parts.