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LED Datasheets Answered

   Whenever I'm working on circuit, I often find it helpful to view the datasheet for a certain component. This is especially helpful with transistors and IC's that I pull out of old electronic devices. Finding datasheets for those kinds of components is easy because the ID number is written right on it, but what I'd like to know is how to find datasheets for LED's. Obviously, they aren't going to have any numbers printed on them and most of the time, I don't remember the circuit board or store I got them from so how would I find the datasheet for one. You might wonder why I need a datasheet, but it's often important and/or useful to know the max voltage or current needed, as well as the lens type, amount of light emitted, etc. , especially on infrared or RGB leds. Any help would be appreciated.

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Kiteman

7 years ago

You could try storing your LEDs in a small plastic bag, and include a note of the required information on a piece of paper?

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spystealth1Kiteman

Reply 7 years ago

What information? If I don't have the datasheet, I can't find out anything about it besides its origin.

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Kitemanspystealth1

Reply 7 years ago

I meant in future - keep the specs with your future purchases of LEDs.

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GoodhartKiteman

Reply 7 years ago

That's if he purchased them. Cannibalized from a component board, or gotten in bulk from Electronic Goldmine, etc...he won't have that info.

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spystealth1Goodhart

Reply 7 years ago

Of course I'll try to keep the specs from purchased components, but like Goodhart said, most of my parts are from broken electronics. (Recycle, reduce, reuse.) :)
One thing I thought of was to look up the board I got them from as the boards themselves usually have an ID number of some sort printed on them, but this is no good if you don't have the board.

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Goodhartspystealth1

Reply 7 years ago

Sometimes you have to just find what "might" be average or the "lower" end of the specs and test from there. Componant test boxes, albeit a bit tricky sometimes to make, are great for this kind of thing. I once had both a cap and resistor test box that I'd made, but, my luck ran out and I smoked it one day.

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spystealth1Goodhart

Reply 7 years ago

I don't really have a problem with voltage, except the occasional weird infrared led, but there are a lot of other factors involved in choosing the right LED for the right project.

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Goodhartspystealth1

Reply 7 years ago

UV's and Ultrabrites are a bit different too IIRC. Yes, that is very true in some cases. I have 3 small plastic tubs filled with misc. LED's from Eletronic Goldmine so I know where you are coming from :-)

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Goodhart

7 years ago

Unless you "know" they are odd ball (higher voltage, etc) type LEDs, it is normally safe to go with the "mean" for each "type" of LED (reds, greens, yellows, UV's, ultraBrites, IR).