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LED sound sensitive Equaliser. How to do it? Answered

I have this idea for a house project. I want to build a LED sound equaliser that would spread on an area of up to 40x80 cm.
That would imply LED positioned at a distance of 4cm one of each other; 20 columns of 10 leads each. 
I would then like to cover each separate coloured led with an opaque plastic square to give the panel the grid-like look that an equaliser has, panels that will illuminate with different colours due to the light coming from the LEDs underneath them.
This (the finished panel) would go positioned under a the glass from a coffee table, giving it a rather nifty look when the music it`s playing (almost all the time).  
I know what i want to do with the actual table, but i dont really know where to start with the LED panel (done some amateur electronics a long time ago, but i could say i`m at the low novice level). 
Would that even be possible, having to connect 200 leds at the same time?
Please let me know if there are any projects that could help me (regarding the circuit/ power supply/ recommended LEDs), and share with me any of your ideas that could help me reach my goal.

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Nighter3D
Nighter3D

5 years ago

Driving 200 leds ain't nothing, but far from impossible. Mostly you need a fast controller and a way to get the visual information.

For controlling large amounts of pixels in displays most use Multiplexing which can severely reduce the amount of the pins (in this case 30 pins. 10 for the colums and 20 for the rows). A fast controller can easilly use multiplexing to control 200 leds without people even noticing only a few are on at any time! you can also use shift registers to further reduce the amount of pins needed (my register of choice for multiplexing is the 74HC595 as it can latch).

As for getting the required sound there are multiple choices. One solution is to get a Visualizer chip that is capable of disecting the signal for you, But the most simple way is to use a good Processor. I made a 20 band Visualizer with a Teensy3.1 board which has a very handy Audio Library that includes a FFT function (which is great for Spectrum visualization)

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

5 years ago

Me, I'd use addressable LEDs, like NeoPixels, and then drive the display with a Raspberry Pi (like my Xmas tree instructable) or possibly with an Arduino.

This ISN'T an equaliser, its just a spectrum display.

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 5 years ago

As for construction i would make a box of 14 x 25 smaller boxes. Paint the inside of each white and install a 5 mm LED in the back. Front with opaque Acrylic.

The size you make each box will determin the final size of the display.