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LEDs as a replacement? Answered

I've been thinking, which, for me is strange. What's stranger, i've been thinking about saving the planet. I don't believe that global warming is solely the fault of man and his machines, nor do i believe that we're all going to fry in a ten-thousand year summer, but that's not the point of this forum, and i'd appreciate no comments labelling me as a communist, or a planet-hater. What i had in mind is a new system of lighting. Say i took some LEDs (lets say 16) and connected them in paralell, and attatched them to the appropriate power source, would they be more or less efficient than a tungsten filament lamp? As for aesthetic considerations, to simulate natural sunlight during winter months, one could add blue or yellow LEDs to tune the shade of the light. Would this idea be more efficient than the lights we have? (i avoided mentioning those energy-efficient lights because they're not really that efficient, and give crap light.)

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westfw

11 years ago

State-of-the-art LEDs are currently much more efficient than incandescents, and getting very close to the efficiencies of fluorescents. However, a 100W incandescent puts out about 1700 lumens. To get that much light out of LEDs take 17 100 lumen (~1W, a total of 17W) LEDs, and the heat dissipation problem becomes pretty substantial - unlike an incandescent filament, LED chips don't work very well above 50C or so... (LEDs brighter than 100Lumen are available, but I think the efficiency starts dropping off above 1W dissipation...) And you're looking at about $3 each for the 1W+ LEDs, or $50 for the 100W equiv... Then there's the whole "overall efficiency" comparison that says "by the time you put your incandescent behind a lampshade you lose even more efficiency, but LEDs don't need any fixtures at all." I'll believe that when I see a widely accepted LED fixture that doesn't lose any light. Still, there are some areas where LEDs are a clear winner; night lights, probably desk lamps, and mid-range flashlights come to mind...

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NachoMahma

11 years ago

> would they be more or less efficient than a tungsten filament lamp . Unless your power supply to drive the LEDs is terribly inefficient, the LEDs will win hands down. . > Would this idea be more efficient than the lights we have? . Certainly. . . The only problem I've noticed with LEDs in homes is that they tend to be very directional.