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Lack of experience = trouble ... do you think, you can help ??? Answered

Hi ... it's me again, with my stepper motors. Thanks to your previous answers, I was able to find out, that these are really stepper motors and I bought a motor shield for arduino to be able to operate them.

I made a successful experiment with one of them (on second picture) ... but when I tried to modify the second motor for "bredboard use" I made a disaster.

There where 4 pins that were melted in a plastic, that holds them in fixed position. But when I was trying to desolder them, by using a desoldering wick ... and heated one pin to much that it melted the plastic, it fell out and it got loose from the wire.

As you can (hardly see) on the first picture ... I ended with an ULTRA thin wire that is really short(<2mm) and I don't know how to save/fix the motor.

Any suggestions ??? Thank you very much in advance.

Zholy

Discussions

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seandogue
seandogue

10 years ago

how thin is thin? 2mm is definitely stubby, but if the motor carries low current, you may be able to do a modified ring solder on the joint using 26 ga stranded wire or wire-wrap wire, by first tinning the stripped end of the wire, then forming it into a ring shape slightly larger than that of the stub, then carefully (and quickly) soldering that preformed ring onto the stub. It all depends on your skill and a bit of luck.

A trick for making the ring is to
1) strip wire
2) tin wire
3) reheat wire and "flick" to remove excess solder
4) bend tinned wire tip around a pin of same diameter as target, using an Exacto to hold the wire tip firmly while using needle nose pliers to assist

Alternatively, the same "game" can be played using a bit of wire from a resistor or transistor, but I prefer wire, since you can get longer lengths to prevent connection at the other end from reheating the repair joint and potentially compromising the solder job.  I performed many such repairs in the past to support visiting researcher built experiments that were erm, less than robust.

Worst case, if the motor seems a bust anyway, you could try your hand at cracking the case and attempting deeper surgery...If nothing else, it might be a good post-mortum look inside the motor.

best wishes.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

10 years ago

As redneck says, but first prepare somewhere to secure the new wire, or you will break the remanents of the old one.

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Sandisk1duo
Sandisk1duo

10 years ago

i doubt you can fix it...

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RedneckEngineer
RedneckEngineer

10 years ago

Can you solder a wire to it to make it longer?  Thats what I would do.