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Looking for ideas for a movable (vertically) TV wall mount? Answered

I have a TV in the gym. It's a good height for when I'm sitting on equipment but the wife like's to do yoga via video streaming and the TV is too high when sitting/lying down. I'm looking for some advice on how to create a wall mount that can move vertically, but can also swing left and right a little.

Ideally it needs to hold a small speaker and a mobile too.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

1 year ago

Don't know if I am overthinking or you...
I have monitor mounts at work that do just that.
Move up or down within about 60cm rotate around the base about 270° and yes, the monitor can be tilted as well.
Even the local harware store here sell similar mounts for TV's, but I think limited to about 10kg for the TV....

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

1 year ago

I am guessing this is a gym in your house. You call it "the gym," but it is truly "your gym." Otherwise, why contemplate changing the furniture around like you own the place. Maybe that is obvious, and irrelevant to the topic anyway.

Drawer slides,

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=drawer+slides&iar=images...

work well, to give an object the ability to move smoothly back and forth, in a straight line.

The only problem with drawer slides, is they are usually not very long, only as long as the depth of a typical drawer. I am trying to think if there is a style of drawer slide, made with extra, stackable, sections, so it could have any length?

Wheels on rails, like a train on a track, can move forward and back. Although for vertical motion you will need something other than gravity, to keep the wheels on their tracks.

Also regarding gravity, for vertical motion a counterweight connected by a cable and a pulley, helps, so that moving the object does not require work to lift it (or give work back when dropping it). That is to say, the counterweight moves down whenever the weight moves up, and the sum of the potential energy in both of them is constant, independent of position.

Actually the counterweight might be too complicated, but without it you have some way to lock the object that moves up and down, and the lock has to be strong enough to resist the weight of the object.

Although modern TVs are not that heavy, and if it is a TV located in a gym, then the people there are in the mood for lifting things up and down anyway. Ha!
;-)