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Lowering the power coming from wall socket into Wood burner? Answered

Hey hey, I have a wood burning system that I LOVE, but at its lowest setting it burns just a touch too hot. It has a variable temperature dial, but it doesn't go quite low enough for me. Is there a way for me to reduce the power coming into it from the wall? 

As an example of the kind of reduction I'm looking for. If I run my small space heater off the same outlet, the wood burner burns slightly cooler at a temperature that works for me.

Any help would be extremely helpful! Thank you in Advance!

Mike

Discussions

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NeilRG

2 years ago

How capable / comfortable are you with doing electrical wiring. Did you follow what i was saying about the idea of the dimmer??

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steveastrouk

2 years ago

What unit have you got ? What voltage does the unit run at ?

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MichaelW552steveastrouk

Answer 2 years ago

My unit is a 10 amp system, running on a US wall socket, so 120V.

Today I went to an electronics shop to test out the system using a Variac. We found that reducing the Voltage to 100V - 110V gave me the desired outcome. But Variacs are really big and expensive. I figure there has got to be a slightly smaller and less expensive way to drop the voltage. But researching transformers has proved unhelpful seeing as though I don't know much about electronics.

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MichaelW552steveastrouk

Answer 2 years ago

Possibly, I'm not entirely sure. This is the unit I use: https://store.razertip.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=120VSSD10

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steveastroukMichaelW552

Answer 2 years ago

Can you open it up and look ? Take a picture ? It will give me a clue as to the best solution for you.

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steveastroukMichaelW552

Answer 2 years ago

Sadly I don't think there's any economic way to reduce the power without knowing otherwise, it has to be a variac.

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NeilRG

2 years ago

The response here is assuming that you are using a tool similar to a soldering iron to burn wood to do creative design. If that is NOT the case ignore what follows. What you are noticing about lowering the power output of the woodburner with the heater plugged in is potentially dangerous because it says you are getting a voltage drop by overloading the electrical circuit supplying both units. Assuming you are in the U.S. and working with a nominal 120 volts you might consider buying an electrical dimmer of the appropriate WATTAGE to handle the current draw of the iron by itself refer to the irons manufacturer spec. Install the dimmer into a suitable metal enclosure and provide a single outlet to plug the iron into to avoid overloading the dimmer. Your local home center electrical dept. can source what you will need.

The reason this is safer is that the dimmer does not increase the load on the electrical circuit but reduces the average power available to the woodburner.

i hope this helps.

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MichaelW552NeilRG

Answer 2 years ago

My unit is a 10 amp system, running on a US wall socket, so 120V.

Today I went to an electronics shop to test out the system using a Variac. We found that reducing the Voltage to 100V - 110V gave me the desired outcome. But Variacs are really big and expensive. I figure there has got to be a slightly smaller and less expensive way to drop the voltage. But researching transformers has proved unhelpful seeing as though I don't know much about electronics.

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NeilRGMichaelW552

Answer 2 years ago

What model of wood burner are you using specifically 10 amps seems like a lot of power as it equates to 1200 Watts of load current which is more power than any soldering station i have uses.