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Mariko Kusumoto Answered

I have been trying to create color stripes in the same manner as Mariko Kusumoto. Cotton and silk thread have not worked. I think I need a different tool to apply polyester dye or different thread. The second image is messy but it was to test the strength of the dye on the bubbles. I think my problem now is how to draw the lines using polyester dye before steaming. 

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yama-man
yama-man

5 weeks ago

Here are some images of works by Saberah Malik. Elegant and ethereal! Although textile jewelry is now in vogue - see Museum of Arts and Design (madmuseum) LOOT: MAD About Jewelry 2019 and artists like Nora Fok at the V&A Museum and https://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/articles/bubble-bath-nora-fok (another likely origin of Mariko Kusumoto's work. For another likely source, see the textile coral installation and environmental commentary by Margaret and Christine Wertheim at https://www.margaretwertheim.com/crochet-coral-reef ) - textile as a medium of expression offers many artistic and evocative sculptural possibilities!

SABERAH MALIK PEACE ROSARY.jpgSABERAH MALIK STONES FROM PORTFOLIO.jpgSABERAH MALIK STONES.JPGSaberah Malik-Keepers of My Yard Line .jpgSABERAH MALIK HAND DYEING SILK STONES.jpgSABERAH MALIK NETWORKS RHODE ISLAND.jpg
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yama-man
yama-man

5 weeks ago

For a "How To" demonstration of the heat-setting technique, see Saberah Malik, Networks Rhode Island,https://networksrhodeisland.org/saberah-malik/ (originally aired on PBS Rhode Island) Saberah Malik developed the technique after observing that during shibori dyeing fabric would form into an almost exact three dimensional copy of the object it was wrapped around (stone, rock, marble, etc) after a gentle boiling. So, (1) tightly wrap and stitch fabric (synthetic works best) around an object, (2) gently boil, (3) after cooling, remove the object and restitch the seam. And you are left with an almost perfect three dimensional copy of the object. Saberah Malik works primarily with rock and stone shapes, but the technique can work with almost any shape. In my view, she is a pioneer, having developed the technique. For more, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saberah_Malik Use your imagination and see what you can make!!!

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yama-man
yama-man

6 weeks ago

See Saberah Malik, Networks Rhode Island. https://networksrhodeisland.org/saberah-malik/ I believe that she is the origin of Mariko Kusumoto's technique. When later describing her own technique, which she deems "proprietary", Mariko Kusumoto uses phraseology (fabric memorizing or remembering) almost identical to that used by Saberah Malik in the Networks Rhode Island video. Compare, Mariko Kusumoto's thisiscolossal,com online interview to Saberah Malik's Networks Rhode Island "How-To" demonstration.

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jeremyzschau
jeremyzschau

1 year ago

Thank you for the suggestion. That would be far too weak. Polyester is really difficult to dye. I also mixed dye powder with 1$ shoji glue from Yamashin home center but that didn't work either. I need something that stains plastic.

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marinnj
marinnj

1 year ago

Have you tried using thread that is already dyed such as embroidery thread? It almost seems like the color is transferred onto the fabric in the setting/steaming process rather than painted on afterwards.