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Monitor powered by ATX Answered

I searched for hours with varying keywords and can't find too much information...  12v to pin 1 and GND to pin 2 but what do I do about the neutral? I read a xbox 360 laptop mod but it involves the 5v too, and connects it to the power brick. I'm trying to do something different. Trying to make a lunchbox out of a macpro 1.1 case. 1 wire to plug into an outlet is better than needing two.


Before I get into this project im trying to understand what I need to buy and feel kinda silly asking such a question which should be extremely simple but I want to be safe and dont want to fry anything.

For those that are actually interested in what I'm doing, I kept staring at the case thinking "what can I make with this, and the items I have laying around?" I thought I'd 1-up the basic hackintosh build and go against the grain of using the case how it's intended. I flipped it so the side with the I/O ports were sitting flat, measured the inside which gave me 7" of workable space with 0.4" wiggle room which made perfect for an mini ITX to be laying flat down instead of against the wall. I thought I could take my dremel and cut out an area for a LCD monitor. I have enough DVD drives laying around as well that I could make a "push tray to eject keyboard" sort of slide out keyboard upgrading the rails, using an ultra thin keyboard with a track pad and top it off with sound activated lights and my 1.5 TB HD that's almost full of music. I realize I can do this with a laptop and pocket usb speaker/light effects, but it wouldn't be as cool and I wouldn't get to reuse these items I have sitting around.

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bvarious

4 years ago

I haven't decided what monitor to use yet, but to be more specific PSU's have an excess of Molex 4 pin connectors, the idea is to simply cut open and strip a monitor power cable, solder plugs then slide a molex sleeve so in event the monitor or psu goes bad I can just plug it in a different one. I just wanted to be 100% sure it's safe, and if I would need to put a fuse in between or any of that. But yes, run 1 power cord to the PSU and use it solely to power the monitor, computer, speakers, lights etc.

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mpilchfamilybvarious

Reply 4 years ago

I understand your idea. This is all well and good if the monitor in question is designed to run off 12VDC. In which case it would have a power cable to plug into your car or one that comes off a power brick/wall-wart rated at 12VDC output. If that where the case you would only have the positive and negative wires to deal with. Which would be easy to attach to the 12V and ground of a female Molex connector and plug into the PSU.

Your question talks about 3 wires. Which sounds like you've been looking at a regular computer monitor. One that uses the same 3 pronged cable you plug into the back of the ATX PSU. This is an AC cable. Which means the monitor needs mains power from the wall and won't work from 12VDC. But like I mentioned before you can wire this into the ATX PSU internally so you only have 1 power cable coming out the back of the system. Or you can buy a special pass through cable that will plug into the back of the PSU and the monitor. Then the regular power cable plugs into the wall and into that pass through connection. but those can be hard to find.

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mpilchfamily

4 years ago

What monitor are you working with?

Monitors use mains power to
run their own internal power supply that breaks out the needed voltages
to run the various parts of the display. 12V may be one voltage it
needs but there are others. If it is only the DC voltages your trying to
wire into the output of the ATX supply then there will only be 2 wires
per voltage rail to worry about.

Kind of sounds like you want to
take a single mains power cable from the wall and have it send power to
both the ATX PSU and the Monitor correct? If so Black is power,
White/Red is neutral and green is ground/earth. The single pin by itself
is ground/earth. You can open up the ATX PSU, cut the end off a power
cable for the monitor and solder the cable to the back side of the ATX
PSU's power connector.