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Newbie Answered

Hey everyone, 
I'm completely new to all this do it yourself stuff. I'm really excited about it, but I have a few questions:

1. What do you think is the best project that a newbie should start with? I have no experience with soldering, or any other advanced stuff, and I do not have anything to solder with. Also, I'm interested in mechanical stuff, electronics, gadgets, and computer related stuff... I really like the Powerlace instructable, and am thinking about doing it, but it seems quite hard for someone who is just starting... 

2. On average, how much does it cost to do an instructable on Instructables??

3. Is there anything I should know before I start making things?

Thanks in Advance

Discussions

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Goodhart

8 years ago

Also, if you use the "reply" button inside the box of the person you are replying too, they get notified so they can answer you if you ask a question...just a friendly FYI :-)

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hhabibi00

8 years ago

Well, the problem is that i'm 15 years old(turning 16 this December), and I don't know if my mom will let me do this kids of stuff. I need a specific instructable that I could show here and that she could see.

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batonas

8 years ago

a good instructable dont have to be something big or expensive, just something new or forgoten, I am almost sure you have something to show thats boting to you but would be exciting for people in instructables, just sertch for it to make sure there are nothing similar, and remember good photos are base for good instructable. good luck makeing your firs instructable.

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Goodhart

8 years ago

1: this depends on a GREAT number of things really. Have you any skills at all?
You may want to start there.

Search through the site using the Custom Search, and you can narrow it down to just Instructables by then clicking on Graphical Search. 

I have some easy projects, in my "collection"  (such as a simple fade off LED which demonstrates how a capacitor drains, etc).  

2:  I doubt that an "average price" will be very helpful to you.  Projects are sometimes as cheap as some discarded wire, and old salvaged transistor, a bit of solder and the electricity to run the iron (i.e. pennies) up to several hundred dollars for, say a desktop laser etcher.


3:  severa; good ones have already been mentioned  (depending on what you are working on and the equipment being used, wear ear, eye, or breathering protection; gloves when needed, etc).
I'd add that you should probably read the instrctions through at least twice to make sure you understand what and how you are doing the project, and if anything is unclear after several readings,  find out from someone or google it.   Better safe then sorry, and it is always better to make sure you've wired up that transistor properly rather then smoking it and having to buy another :-)  

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OrigamiAirEnforcer

8 years ago

Well, paper airplanes cover low cost and simplicity.... :P

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Kiteman

8 years ago

1> With well over 50,000 projects to choose from, it is incredibly hard to recommend any particular starting project. Instead, I would recommend you browse the ebooks for a project that grabs your attention. Of course, you don't have to follow anybody else's work, you could produce and publish your own Instructables.

2> It is also impossible to give a specific cost to projects - some, like the re-builds of cars, or construction of workshops - can cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars. Arduino projects will cost $30-$100 to start, but many projects (such as most of mine) cost almost nothing at all, being made from found or recycled materials.

3> If a project doesn't work, there is always somebody around who can offer help. If you do something silly and make a complete mess of it, you can always start again.

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Flintlock

8 years ago

Here's a few answers:

1. When I started tinkering around with electronic 'ibles, I started off with the simpler electronics that required just a few components. They usually were bike lights, soldering how-tos, and Altoid tin hacks. Then I got a little adventurous, and moved up to larger projects. You may want to check out a few guides. There are some for beginner electronic projects.

2. That's a little hard to say... Some of the instructables use materials that are very low cost to free, some are thousands of dollars.... It just depends on how resourceful you are. I commonly get old electronics from relatives, and salvage the parts. Or hacknmod old things that have been lying around my house for years.

3. Always use protection. Unless you don't want to. Then anything that happens is your fault. Even though it's your fault anyways, even if you do have protection. Child support sucks.