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Pop-up tents Answered

Has anyone ever made or taken apart a pop-up tent or hamper or whatnot? I really would like to know what kind of wire they use and how they do it. I think it would make for some interesting and versatile set pieces.

I'm thinking along the lines of this type of thing.

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youll_never_guess
youll_never_guess

3 years ago

I suspect it's this stuff: https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/spring-steel-wire-in-pop-up-tents.html

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Srichter1090
Srichter1090

4 years ago

So I stumbled across this while I was looking to see if anyone has made a pop-up tent for beach shade, and figured that in case anyone was still curious 8 years later I'd add to this :) If you are opening them up and finding springy steel stuff, they probably use the same type of boning used to make corsets. (here http://corsetmaking.com/costume-continuous-boning/CMS-SSB4-CR.html).

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Srichter1090
Srichter1090

Reply 4 years ago

It could also be the completely flat steel and plastic used for hoop skirts (here http://corsetmaking.com/hoop-boning/CMS-WSB2-CR.html). I'm relatively certain it's probably one of those though!

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hollycrest
hollycrest

13 years ago

Did you ever find out where to buy this flat springy steel used in pop up products?

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Icetigris
Icetigris

Reply 12 years ago

No, I never did find out what it is. It looks like the stuff I have in my pop-up hamper is a ribbon of some kind of steel wire, but I'm not too sure.

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Patrik
Patrik

Reply 12 years ago

Yeah - your best source for this kind of stuff may very well be the local dollar store. I think I saw some of those pop-up clothes hampers there, for only a few $ a piece. That'll give you several feet per $.

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Kiteman
Kiteman

13 years ago

It's either a flat springy steel strip (if it's a cheap kids' garden tent), or narrow carbon-fibre rods.

Be careful with the carbon-fibre - there is a minimum radius you can bend them too - wind them too tight and you have extremely sharp carbon-fibre splinters. A fellow Cub leader got such a splinter in his finger last month - it went right through, like those joke nail-injuries you get in crackers.

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NachoMahma
NachoMahma

Reply 13 years ago

. Carbon-fibre?!?!? Learn how to spell! Even Firefox pukes over 're' ROFLMAO
. Isn't CF still rather expensive for cheap toys and gadgets? I'll take your word for it, but I always thought the non-"flat springy steel strip" rods were cheaper fiberglass (or something similar).
. Not that I've ever looked that close at the rods, but you looked like you could use some abuse. <snicker>

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LasVegas
LasVegas

Reply 13 years ago

The word fibre is the proper British spelling of the word fiber. Both are correct and used interchangeably.

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NachoMahma
NachoMahma

Reply 13 years ago

. I was just giving him a hard time. ;) Someone else, who shall remain anonymous, was harassing him about a minor typo in another thread.

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whatsisface
whatsisface

Reply 13 years ago

I think we all know who won that one :P

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Reply 13 years ago

Interchangeable?

What about metre versus meter?

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zachninme
zachninme

Reply 13 years ago

Well, metre/meter is not fibre/fiber :P

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Reply 13 years ago

Just pointing out the importance of watching for the re/er switch.

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Icetigris
Icetigris

13 years ago

I looked at what's in my pop-up hamper and it looks like steel strips. Any idea what kind of steel strips should I look for? Galvanised, stainless, carbon, etc.? I found manufacturers' sites, though nowhere to order the stuff online easily.

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Reply 13 years ago

Errr I think LasVegas or Vendigroth are your materials experts, but I would look for spring steel. Not galvanised, probably not stainless, maybe carbon?