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Pumping Water in the Arctic! Answered

As a small background to the project I am working on: I am currently doing my Masters of Architecture in Copenhagen, and we are designing devices to bring on our expedition to the North Pole, and I am harnessing salt water to pump through salt water batteries.

My question is then: What kind of pump do I need to pump water up 2 meters? I don't need much water coming up at once, just needs to be constant. I am also looking for the most energy efficient way of doing this, any know of something?

Any help is much appreciated! :)

Thanks,

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mpilchfamily

4 years ago

Salt water batteries are extremely inefficient. You'll need a vary large and vary heavy battery just to accommodate a small pump to keep fresh water flowing through the batteries. Have you worked out the size of the battery you will need for the trip and how much power it will produce?

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arctic_devicesmpilchfamily

Reply 4 years ago

Hi and thanks for the reply! Trust me, I am well aware of the plethora of issues revolving around this project haha. What I have worked out if that I can get about 0.8 volts per cell, and I have the batteries hooked up with six cells each, which hooked up in series give me about 4.3 volts. *Please note, that I am so new to this stuff* Not to sure about amperage.

I will have a skin or blanket rather, that will be supported vertically. My goal is to pump water through a whole in the ice up to the top of the structure to run water though it, have it fall down though it basically. Anyway, so probably around 50 of these batteries which I still have to figure out the best way to connect.

This probably sounds ridiculous, but I'm studying to be an architect, you gotta be a bit crazy. ;)

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mpilchfamilyarctic_devices

Reply 4 years ago

It is ridiculous. Most pumps that will suit your needs will need at least 12V and will likely draw an amp or 2. So not only will you need 15 cells to get the voltage needed you'll probably need several more sets of 15 cells wired in parallel to support the total power draw of just the pump.

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arctic_devicesmpilchfamily

Reply 4 years ago

Thanks again for answering. Good to know. As I am pretty useless when it comes to electrical circuits, what kind of amperage would I need for a pump like that. Or what range?

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caitlinsdad

4 years ago

Salt water corrosion and operating temp would be important considerations. I think you would need to know the expected usage rate to calculate the head pressure and find a pump suitable for that. Maybe contact marine equipment suppliers to see what they recommend or find out what gear the use at the north and South Pole scientific outposts. Good luck.

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arctic_devicescaitlinsdad

Reply 4 years ago

Hi! Thanks for the reply. I am not too sure what the usage rate would be, this kind of stuff is very new to me. If I had to compare it to something I would think the water rate would be similar to something to irrigate a sort of hydroponic system. I've been looking on their forums as well, and have found a few alternatives.