168Views5Replies

Author Options:

Removing hairspray from painted woodwork Answered

Can anyone suggest how to remove hairspray (off spray) from painted wooden surfaces (doors) as we have tried all proprietary household products and white spirit without any success and it would be nice to have to avoid repainting the doors..!!

Discussions

0
None
EvJamie

10 months ago

Did you manage to remove it? Maybe dampen a microfiber cloth with some isopropyl 70% alcohol?

0
None
Briarswood

10 months ago

Thank you to all for the suggestions and apologies for the tardy response but other pressing matters getting in the way. Hva just tried a small test with the Acetone and with some effort it seems to work and not damage the paint. More to try and will try Meths too. Many thanks again and will revert once I have firm results.

0
None
ThirdEarthDesign

10 months ago

Could try baking soda mixed with warm water? or try Methylated Spirits, but test on a small sample area first and be sure to read all safety warnings on the bottle.

0
None
Yonatan24

10 months ago

Try a sharp razor like knife and scrape it off

0
None
Briarswood

10 months ago

Downunder35m wow, thank you for your serious efforts some of which I had tried but your answer also sent me off on research too in respect of Orange Oil which I had not heard of, (a failure of being in the oil industry al my working life and thus a single line focus..!! LOL). Ths ofcourse pused me on to understand what d-limonene or Limonene was which comes right back up my street as a type of hydrocarbon. Equally I had not heard of the term Eraser Sponges but my good lady had. I will try the Orange Oil ad the Acetone as suggested by seamster. Thank you again for all you efforts and I think if you ever need to paint onto of varnished window frames or similar surfaces, spray them with hair spray first and then everything will stick like super glue.........

0
None
Downunder35m

10 months ago

Found a can of old hairspray left from my printing days so I experimented a bit.
Can only go from a no name but really sticky composition...
On a glass surface it becomes obvious that it is a two component mix.
A solvent and the stuff that make the hair go hard.
Judging by the burn appearance once the gas part is evaporated I tend to say the solvent is alcohol.
Freshly applied it cleans off nice with alcohol too but once fully dry and hard not so much.
But alcohol can ruin a lot of paint too, so moving on.
Tested on some old and painted window frame I had left it turns out the stuff is actually a real pain in the behind.
It certainly acts like a primer and bonds really well to not just the paint but also the dust and dirt on it, creating almost a sealed area.
Even the fog from spraying at a great distance is bad here.
Eraser sponges work but fade away quickly.
Hot soapy water does work to some extent but requires a rough spongeand this can cause scratches on the paint.
In a last ditch attempt I tried orange oil and it worked better than the rest.
Still needs some decent scrubbing and then a wash to remove the oil from the surface but it did not affect the paint on my frame and did a really good deep clean of the surface too.
Sadly orange or citrus oil also eats my eraser sponge, so no combination here but at least it cleans in a reasonable time without damage.
But please do a spot check first before you try it on a full door ;)
And as said, I can't tell if it works the same for all the many types of hair spray out there.

0
None
Briarswood

10 months ago

mole1 thank you for the suggestion but I am trying to do what I can to avoid painting them again. I just need to find what "cuts" the spray composition. The manufacturers would offer zero suggestions and avoided th question with a full "cover their rear" answer.....probably best we don't understand the chemicals in it..!! Thank you

0
None
mole1

10 months ago

I've gotten it off chrome light fixtures with white erasure sponges after soaking in a commercial degreasing detergent. Depending on the kind of paint that is on the doors, you may need to lightly sand and repaint. The problem with getting hair spray off paint is that the solvent in the hairspray may be the same kind that was in the paint.

0
None
Downunder35mmole1

Reply 10 months ago

1+!
Eraser sponges are great here.
The key is to have many and not to use too much water while applying only light pressure.

I used hairspray in the beginning of my 3D printing period and have to say it can be a pain to remove if you can't use a scraper, steel wool or aggressive solvents.
But funny enough in many cases just really hot, soapy water did the trick, never had to try it on painted surfaces though.

0
None
Briarswood

10 months ago

Thank you seamster for that suggestion its a good idea and I will keep the caveat in mind.

0
None
seamster

10 months ago

I would try acetone/nail polish remover. Maybe test a small hidden spot first to see how it effects the paint though. Good luck!