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SOLAR HOUSE???????? Answered

my power bill is through the roof.
how would i solar my house??? THX SO MUCH !!!!!

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dimntd

7 years ago

Build It Solar has information and DIY plans.
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Projects.htm

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Re-design

7 years ago

Google "solar house" "cut energy bills" etc. There REALLY is tons of good info on the net. Much much more that you could ever read let alone act upon.

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rickharris

7 years ago

Stop heat escaping Number one!!!!

Double/tripple glaze - Stop draughts

Look at solar heating of water system

look at solar cells t generate electricity 9a young industry) BUT Think and study carefully if the short term returns are worth the investment.

Turn thermostat down 1 deg save 10% of heating bill.

Turn off ALL standby devices. DON'T leave chargers plugged in and switched on.

Insulate hot water tank even if it is already insulated put a quilt over it. - Pile old clothes on top. put a sleeping bag over it STOP HEAT ESCAPING.

DON'T leave doors open - or windows in winter. Particularly if the heating is still on.

Wear MORE clothes in the house in cold weather and turn heating down or off.


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orksecurity

7 years ago

Depends on where you are, how much solar energy you get, and what you want to do with it.

First step, in terms of cost-effectiveness, is always conservation. Using less electricity costs far less than generating, and there are a lot of low-cost (and some subsidized) things you can do along those lines. And those improvements in your house and how you use it will pay off even if you *do* install solar.

After that -- you can do solar hot water or solar electricity, but unless you've got a lot of area you're willing to cover with solar cells probably not both.

The simplest answer for photocells is to invest in one of the setups where you're essentially selling the electricity back to the power grid. If the power company in your area allows this, it avoids the need for you to deal with maintaining your own batteries and/or switching over appliances to low-voltage sources, which used to be a major bottleneck. You will certainly need an electrician to install the interface to the power lines, and frankly I'd hire an expert to at least design the rest of the system even if you do your own installation -- not least because the expert can tell you what's actually cost-effective, how much it's likely to cost you, and how many years you'd have to operate the system before it paid off your initial investment and started actually being a net savings.

(Note that since it IS a substantial investment, you can't expect the pay-off to be very quick -- so if you plan to move in the next few years this may not be the best answer; the next buyer may not think the solar system is worth what you put into it.)

If you're in an area served by One Block Off The Grid, they might be a good place to start. They arrange group purchases of solar systems, which may save you some money.