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Send power wirelessly? Answered

Is it possible to send power wirelessly? If it is, could someone tell me how to do it? I want to mod my wirelessly Xbox 360 controller so that it wouldn't need batteries. Thanks

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PKM
PKM

12 years ago

You can do it at reasonable efficiency at a distance of a couple of centimetres, or less. This is mostly used for recharging things without having a plug with electrical contacts. You can transfer power at something like 25% efficiency across a distance comparable to the size of the transmitter/receiver, so for an XBox controller about 10 or 15 cm. There is current research in extending that limit to perhaps 2 or 3 times the size of the transmitter/receiver, again at a fairly poor efficiency. Some people claim Nikola Tesla could wirelessly transmit power a long distance, but some people claim a lot of things. If he could, we don't know how.

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killerjackalope
killerjackalope

Reply 12 years ago

I remember some theories about ionised air being used as a conductor, that seemed promising...

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Triblade101
Triblade101

Reply 12 years ago

Thanks for all the help everyone, but considering i only understand like 80% of everything being said, i think I'll stick to my play and charge kit. Some day i might look more into this though....it would make a good project for school. :P

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lemonie
lemonie

13 years ago

Er, microwaves. Microwaves are used for long distance communication, all you need is a transmitter & receiver. You'de probably want to stay out of the way though... You can also use radio, but you need a powerful transmitter and tuned kit. There are articles on the internet but I'm not looking. L

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chooseausername
chooseausername

Reply 13 years ago

I don't remember the name of the N. Tesla project, but he found a mean to produce wireless energy ... his project has been canceled because it was almost impossible to bill consumers ... I wonder if his project was seriously conceivable in a modern society like ours, where every house is equiped of more than one light-bulb ...

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fwjs28
fwjs28

Reply 12 years ago

and stream music,news,power and something else cant remember

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lemonie
lemonie

Reply 13 years ago

Oh yes, I had come across that before, thanks for reminding me. L

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lemonie
lemonie

Reply 13 years ago

Er, think it was short-range induction. Think I saw a photo of him holding a light bulb, the big transmitter being behind him, probably concealed. L

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zachninme
zachninme

Reply 13 years ago

I have a feeling that the billing wasn't the only reason it was canceled. Or, maybe it wasn't finished and they realized the billing partway into it.

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fwjs28
fwjs28

12 years ago

yea, you could use a tesla coil.....basically its like a hose getting smaller and smaller....it comes out at a higher velocity(in this case voltage) but not much comes out (i think this would be amps-not electric genius) and the best part is you can be shocked by it and it wont kill u....tho you will need a doohickey to step down the voltage before going to the xbox as to not fry it....

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fwjs28
fwjs28

Reply 12 years ago

also try a ggole search for tesla coils or even the inventor nikla tesla

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sam
sam

13 years ago

I was doing some research on this a month or two ago, looking to create wireless electricity... I was mainly experimenting with induction over a really small distance, to recharge a cell phone- but I did come across an article concerning a university which had been able to send wireless electricity across the room, using resonant induction- which works much like normal resonance in acoustics. Unfortunately I don't have a link.. try Google..

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zachninme
zachninme

Reply 13 years ago

Try gutting a electric toothbrush. Unless they use batteries, they'll use induction coils to charge.

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NachoMahma
NachoMahma

Reply 13 years ago

. The range on those is measured in mm. I have a Braun that won't even trip my electronic wiggy (but it's setup up for 120V and higher).

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Chouette2011
Chouette2011

13 years ago

Yes, but not yet for consumer use. The folks at MIT have figured out how to make Tesla Coils without the lighting-in-between-the-poles problem, it works for about ten feet now from a standard electrical outlet. It is supposed to be released for public use in the next five years and should have two to three times the range by then. It looks like a bunch of copper wire bundled together. I think there was an article about it in either PC Magazine or Popular Mechanics in the last issue So hope your batteries don't die in the next five years and wait ;-)

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Triblade101
Triblade101

13 years ago

Ok, thanks for the help eveyone. I'll just stick with the Play and Charge kit that i have, until technology advances that is. :)

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zachninme
zachninme

13 years ago

Yeah, maybe you could light an LED, but there's no way you could run a 360 controller without it sitting 1 mm above a induction coil.

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chooseausername
chooseausername

13 years ago

Is it possible to send power wirelessly?

Maybe you could use a tennis ball cannon loaded with batteries ???? =o)

Else, seriously and currently, I'm afraid the answer to your question is simply "no" ...

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NachoMahma
NachoMahma

13 years ago

. Transferring power via radio waves is terribly inefficient, even at close range.To get any kind of efficiency at all (still horrendously low), you need to use very high frequencies (eg, microwaves) which don't mix well with people at high power. . All in all, it would probably be easier, cheaper, and safer to use photovoltaic cells and turn the room lights up. heehee . Seriously, I think acer73 has the right idea.

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acer73
acer73

13 years ago

you can via induction but it has to be very close to the object My advice would be to purchase some rechargeable battery's, you can get a charger and 4 AA at target for I think $20.