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Stripping and varnishing teak timber Answered

How do I strip teak timber that is stained black from using black wet/dry 360 grit sandpaper?

I would appreciate some help..

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SeaBorn49
SeaBorn49

1 year ago

Teak is very pourous and the darkness is the silca in the wood or mildew which teak is prone to get. You can bleach the wood with Clorox to lighten it. You then can either stain it with a product like Semco Teak Sealer which has a mildewcide or a varnish with a UV inhibitor. If you want a good finish use an anaphyletic resin like Quik 15 to build a base of 4 or 5 coats before applying the varnish.

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tefcoombs426
tefcoombs426

Reply 1 year ago

You can use a product containing sodium hypochorite like "Thompson's Deck Wash", a heavy bristle brush followed by a high pressure washer at 200 PSI to clean off the black grit, remove stains from the teak and prepare for varnishing. I have owned a 51ft sailboat completely finished in teak, including the decks, and this cleaning process worked very well. There are many good varnish products on the market, I had the best luck with Epifanes varnish products in the interior cabin work and on the exterior yacht work. I have also used Epifanes on furniture projects in house with great success. The brand is available in most marine supply stores - try West Marine. West Marine is on-line as well as having stores in most major water-sited towns and cities. Epifanes products do have UV inhibitors and the finish holds up better than anything else we have found. As a note, our decks do not get varnished; they are sealed with multiple coats of teak sealer. Our experience has been that "Cabot's Australian Timber Oil", laid down in multiple coats with paint brushes (after cleaning with "Thompson's Deck Wash", looks as well as varnish. It does require re-cleaning and re-oiling more frequently, depending on environmental conditions, but it does eliminate some of the very heavy sanding and use of stripper solvent necessary when removing coats of varnish for new varnish application.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

1 year ago

If by "stained" you mean that you have now the fine grit in holes and crannies the best option is to blow it out with a compressor.
A thin paintbrush that you cut a bit shorter works great to loosen up the grit in thight spaces.
Last but not least: Hotglue.
No joke but if you have a temperature adjustable gun you can heat the stick just hot enough so you press it out.
Makes it less sticky but you might need a higher temp for tight spaces.
Let cool properly, then spry some methylated spirit over the areas with the hotglue - this helps to loosen it from the wood.
You can also try bluetack but be aware that it contains oil and that would need to clean the areas you used it on with alcohol when done.

Next time try wet and dry sandpaper for automotive use, the fabric kind, not the paper stuff ;)
Or these sanding sponges you get in convinient packs with several grit counts.
When working on wood I also prefer to "prime" my sandpaper.
I just rub it over the concrete in my driveway a few times or go over it with a fine wire brush.
You would be surprised to see how much of the frit is very loose on the paper.