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Submit your instructables for a sustainability guide! Answered

Hello community! I haven't posted any instructables in a long time because I've been in college, studying for a sustainable manufacturing degree. After being frustrated at my lack of tools and workspace, I realized that I could just use other people's work! Bear with me here. I'm not stealing your projects or ideas, far from it. I am looking for a few instructables that I can analyze and review based upon their sustainability. I will compare and contrast several projects, relate all this to sustainable manufacturing principles, suggest changes to design or process, and then finally write it all up and publish it as an Instructable for the community to enjoy and learn from. 

All projects and photos will be fully credited to their original creator. 
I don't have an exact time frame of how long this will take, but I estimate that with in depth research and ample procrastination I can get the guide done in two months at the absolute maximum. 
I'm also not sure how many projects I will need for the guide, but I'd like to set it at no more than 5. 

So, if you are interested in having your project analyzed and expanded upon for the benefit of the community, comment here. Here's a few guidelines for what I'm looking for. 
  • PICTURES. If I don't know what the hell your project looks like I can't do anything with it. Also, you must be okay with me copy pasting them into the guide and editing/marking them. 
  • WRITTEN DETAILS: Again, if I don't know what you did to produce the project, I can't really give any complete feedback on it. The more in depth and well written the better! I might very well quote you directly in the text.
  • DURABLE GOODS: Because I'm a manufacturer, I deal with things that are built, in one way or another. I'm sure your recipe is delicious or your computer code can power a spaceship, but I can't really practically analyze it if it's been gobbled up or is buried in some program files. I don't speak code.
  • AT LEAST 6 MONTHS OLD: one of the parts of sustainable practice is to make something that lasts. Therefore I would like to use projects that were made a while ago so that I can ask you how the object is holding up and if it needs to be repaired, how it has been used, any changes you would make, etc.
  • IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE GREEN AND HEALTHY: It wouldn't be much of a compare and contrast guide format if everything produced clean energy and rainbows. I need a spread from environmentally friendly projects to things that belch black smoke and get gallons to the mile. 
  • YOU CAN TAKE CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM: I'm analyzing this from a professional standpoint, not a personal one. If your object has killed a couple of owls in the forest, that obviously isn't very sustainable, and I will mention it as a negative thing. If you can't take this kind of critique, then you won't like this guide very much. 
  • YOU ARE WILLING TO COMMUNICATE: I'll be asking you some questions about your project, if you never answer your Instructables messages or reply in one word answers or 133t5p34k I can't get any useful info for you. 
if I use your project you get a patch from me, and further exposure for your project on the site, as well as a lot of good information for a re-design or refinement of your original idea

Discussions

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tcpipdns

4 years ago

I have no idea what your asking for. Can you explain? Also, if your going to criticize people for helping, personal or professional, why would people want to help?

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ilpugtcpipdns

Reply 4 years ago

I'm looking for community members to submit projects that I can interpret from a standpoint of sustainability and give feedback to the community on to help giver people a good example of the process and practice of sustainability. Also, because criticism isn't always bad, and some people want to learn more about their projects from a different viewpoint and how it could be improved.