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Suggestions requested on attaching Creative Travelsound to bicycle Answered

Hello. As someone who's moved to a bike friendly city, sold his car, learned the intricacies of mass transit... the thing that I miss most about my car is the sound system. Mind you, it was stock, but it was still good enough for me. Well that, and not getting wet when it rains and when the road is still wet. I'm not interested in being the obnoxious jerk at the stop light forcing a 1/4 block to listen all the bass I can afford, I'd like to put together a non-headphone sound system for my bike. I have pictures below of the the three components I have at hand. Jamis coda sport, creative travelsound battery powered speakers (which eats batteries like they are going out of style), and Zen V touch mp3 player. my goal is to have a personal stereo that is quickly detachable, yet secure, and potentially offering improved FM reception by 'hardwiring' an antenna to the frame. upon initial inspection, i suspect the easiest way would be to have a granny basket off the handlebars and just throw it into there. So that's my fallback plan. But there are some geniuses that peruse this site and I'm interested in how they'd attack this. two things to note- while my handlebars are flat, i've rotated the bar that holds them to a 45 degree angle. Also, the travelsound speakers are attached at the base that hinges with the battery pack. It's not that obvious in the picture. Thanks for the help with this.

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LinuxH4x0r
LinuxH4x0r

12 years ago

Why not dissect some cheap headphones to make them attach to your helmet with Velcro. That way you could still hear outside traffic, but not have to worry so much about leaving your speakers on your bike where they might get stolen.

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flove101
flove101

Reply 12 years ago

I think headphones are way too tinny sounding unless they are in your ear correctly. It'd make me want to put them in... and I do not want to ride around cars with phones in... thanks though.

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LinuxH4x0r
LinuxH4x0r

Reply 12 years ago

I mean the louder large ones. Like these:

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flove101
flove101

Reply 12 years ago

Oh. ok. I was thinking you meant earbuds or the wraparound style. With the large ones, I just don't see how they'd fit without compromising the structural integrity of the helmet. How would you integrate them with the helmet?

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LinuxH4x0r
LinuxH4x0r

Reply 12 years ago

I'd take off the strap and attach them with velcro, or just put velcro on the strap and across the top of the helmet

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guyfrom7up
guyfrom7up

12 years ago

how about you attach the speakers where a water bottle would be and wire up your mp3 player to the center of your handle bars?

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flove101
flove101

Reply 12 years ago

I saw a setup like that for an Ipod for around 80 dollars, and the kicker was that the ipod was snuggled in the waterbottle and controlled remotely with a touchpad mounted to the handlebars. If I had an Ipod It would have been hard to resist such a design. my speakers are too large to go the same route.

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caitlinsdad
caitlinsdad

12 years ago

I've seen some front pannier bags that strap across the handlebars. You could make or sew some sort of custom soft bag that could attach with velcro straps. Get a metal lunchbox or soft case the same size and hack it to fit. Hardwarewise you could make some sort of stubby platform or bar coming out or across the handlebars. You could then strap on or velcro your sound setup. Maybe look up sound accessories for motorcyles or mopeds and see if they have anything you can replicate. Good luck.

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flove101
flove101

Reply 12 years ago

I like the hacking up a metal box idea. I went the Google route already and there are some cool handlebar setups with speakers ready to go out of the box, and I'd buy them if I didn't already have something I think I can make work. Tonight I went for a ride and I ended up taking one bungee cord and criss crossing it around the handlebar and the hinge on the speaker, and it was remarkably snug. Then I hung the player from it's lanyard on the speaker and I was in business. However, this is not a workable solution for the every day, as I need to be able to quickly remove and put back on without needing to fiddle to make sure it's not going to fall out. Oh, and having music while biking was AWESOME. I'm completely stoked to make this happen now.