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Testing LED light strips Answered

More questions regarding this: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-super-bright-LED-light-panel-for-vid/

I've added my 30 led strips and have soldered them in place.  The video says it's a good idea to test your strips at this point by connecting them to a power source.

I presume it means to connect the two paired wires on the back of the panel to a power source.  However, I don't know electronics so I'm not sure how to do this.

I have a 12v AC adapter as well as some other power adapters from old laptops.  How do I connect this to the wires? Is there a link to an existing instructable that might explain this for a newbie?

Videomom

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Nawaz

3 years ago

Did you adjust the output voltage from the power supply? If not, it might be that the LED are under powered which explains why the are not working.

To adjust the voltage, you will need a multimeter set to DC voltage.

1. Connect the red probe to +V (any out of the two) and black probe to COM (any out of the two)

2. Turn on your mains supply and read out the voltage on the meter.

3. Insert a small phillips or flat head screw-driver in the orange pot labelled +V ADJ (If the screw-driver is not insulated, make sure it does not touch the case while it's in the pot, just a precaution)

4. Turn the pot clockwise to increase the voltage or counter-clockwise to decrease until you get your desired voltage (12V in your case). Note that its does not need to be exactly 12.00V, slight variation is OK. Anything between 11.95 V - 12.15 V should be fine.

Once you are happy with the voltage, turn off your mains supply. Connect your LED strip to the terminal. Red wire to +V and black wire to COM. Switch mains back on and voila.

If you are not sure of the polarity on your LED strip, post a picture and we will help you out. Hope this helps.

Best Regards,

Nawaz

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Josehf Murchison

3 years ago

It does mean to connect to a power source positive + to positive + and negative - to negative -.

That panel draws something like 10 amps so don't just use any wall adapter.

A car battery or battery charger capable of 10 amps is what you want.

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mazeladyJosehf Murchison

Reply 3 years ago

Hello again. I ended up buying a power supply and am recycling an old laptop power plug. My question is this - how do I determine which is live neutral and ground (blue, yellow or red)?

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Josehf Murchisonmazelady

Reply 3 years ago

Traditionally here in Canada power cords are black power, white neutral, green ground, and red other live, but with trade it is all over the place.

That should be brown live, blue neutral, yellow ground, the round pin is ground, you can see which wire is ground by connecting the leads of a meter set for continuity from the round pin to the yellow wire first. If you get continuity it confirms yellow is ground.

It is a good idea to do the same for the other two pins and wires just to be sure the plug and cord is good.

If one of the two flat prongs is fatter at the end that is neutral, if they are both the same size, point the plug prongs at you with the round pin on the bottom and right is white or neutral.

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mazeladyJosehf Murchison

Reply 3 years ago

I connected the wires as you said to my battery charger set to 'boost' at 10amps using the booster clamps. Nothing happened. No lights. I'm wondering if I should have connected the paired wire to some type of terminal. I can't imagine why I would have no lights at all.

Where should I start checking?

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Josehf Murchisonmazelady

Reply 3 years ago

Start checking at the charger, make sure you are getting power.

Make sure you are connected forwards biased.

A good connection on the pared wires to the charger is best so a terminal is a good idea.