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Tool's very first vacuum pump Answered

My boss cleaned out his office since he's retiring (and I'll miss him, as long as you did your job he left you alone, maybe quarterly reports, just the kind of boss I need) anyways he gave me a vacuum pump, he said its been there unused as long as he has >35years. So I thought I'd get advice before i even plug it in. It's a Curtin Matheson Scientific googleing gave me no info other than the Gast AD220 oil it requires can be substituted with sae 10 detergent oil. Anyone familiar? any advice?

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Orro

10 years ago

Can I have it? I will pay for shipping.

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lemonie

12 years ago

I can see an incoming air-filter and an exhaust oil-mist filter? Or is this a dual input? The gauges look like they go to to -30 inches of mercury? The other scale I cannot read. At a guess this would be a moderate flow, moderate vaccum mechanical oil-pump. What are the bits sticking out left and right, purge valves or mounting screws? Do you have any plans for this? L

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Tool Using Animallemonie

Reply 12 years ago

Since I posted this I actually found a pdf manual for this pump, on the right (pump left) is the vacuum intake with oil mister / particulate filter, on the left (pump right) is the positive pressure outlet with oil filter. The bits sticking out left and right are needle valves for controlling levels of vacuum and pressure. Since disassembly and oiling it will pull 22 inches or merc, if I cheat and drip some 10 sae in the impeller it will pull 27 inches for about 5 minutes. I have no plans right now, I did build something for Easter, but we didn't have an Easter contest, so i'l save it for next year. ;-)

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amrishchawlaTool Using Animal

Reply 11 years ago

Hi Tool, i am a gradaute student at the Ohio State University. I found a similar pump in my lab which i need to use but seems like the motor is stuck. After a lot of google search i was not able to find the mannual you mentioned. I would really appreciate it if you can email the same to me. Many Thanks Amrish achawl1@gmail.com

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fringismorbideamrishchawla

Reply 10 years ago

send me the make and model# and I can most likely get a manual for you; I sell lab equipment including many makes of vacuum pumps - my co. email is tlockwood@san.rr.com

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lemonieTool Using Animal

Reply 12 years ago

Hi, 27 inches is much less than I'd expected, perhaps this shifts a lot more volume than I thought? The incoming needle valve should probably be closed fully for maximum vacuum (not sure about the other). But the incoming valve should be opened as a gas ballast, partially or periodically, if you're sucking on volatiles (water vapour included). I'm somewhat jealous, not that I know what I'd do with one ...

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NachoMahma

11 years ago

. If it's been sitting for 35 years, there's likely to be some rust inside. I'd tear it down and do an inspection. Hopefully, nothing you can't clean up with some fine sandpaper and/or steel wool. Make sure everything moves freely and smoothly, especially the valves (and rings, if it has them). . _I_ wouldn't recommend using motor oil in a vacuum pump, but who am I to argue with the manufacturer? ;)

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Tool Using AnimalNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

wierd, two posts and an email about my pump all on the same day from three different people.

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zhenpenthaye

12 years ago

There's always vacuum filtration, or vacuum distillation.

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lemoniezhenpenthaye

Reply 12 years ago

Ok then, what would you vacuum distill with this? (And would you use vapour-traps or just a gas-ballast?) L

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drcrash

12 years ago

That'd probably be a great pump for vacuum forming. 27 inches is plenty. You can vacuum form plastic 1/4" thick with a pump like that. It looks like a rotary vane pump, which pumps air pretty quickly, so it'd be pretty quick to evacuate a good-sized vacuum tank for a fairly large vacuum former. An old water heater tank makes a good vacuum tank, and you can usually find them for free on Craigs List or Freecycle. The pump is the only expensive part of a homemade but pro-quality vacuum former. The rest is cheap and easy to make.