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Trying to change 120 volt AC to 120 volt DC. Answered

I have the full wave rectifier rated at 400 volts and 8 amps and need to know what kind of capacitor/ voltage regulator I might need to accomplish this. I'm powering two 100 watt lights off this. Thanks!

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JimZ7
JimZ7

4 years ago

Trying to change 120 volt AC to 120 volt DC.

So whats the answer for the original question ?

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

8 years ago

What kind of lights need a regulated supply ?

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evilgenius32
evilgenius32

Answer 8 years ago

The lights are going to be put to music, so I need a DC power supply so it will work with the DC audio circut. the lights are just 120 volt incandescent floodlights

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 8 years ago

Nah. Just use phase controled AC its much easier and safer

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 8 years ago

He's asked for a regulator too.

steve

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mpilchfamily
mpilchfamily

Answer 8 years ago

I read it like he thinks he can use a capacitor and/or voltage regulator to do the AC to DC conversion. If he is worried about any fluctuation in the AC input then a couple of smoothing camps with a voltage regulator isn't a bad idea. But if he is trying to power a Halogen bulb then the slight dips and spikes of 120V mains isn't going to affect the operation of the bulb so a regulator wouldn't be needed.

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evilgenius32
evilgenius32

Answer 8 years ago

The voltage does have to be fairly constant for it to work.

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mpilchfamily
mpilchfamily

Answer 8 years ago

OK well incandescent bulbs need AC not DC.. But if 120VDC is still needed a bridge rectifier will keep the voltage as constant as the supply voltage. Of course main power can fluxuate between 110VAC and 125VAC.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 8 years ago

I read the / as an "and" not an "or"
;-)

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rickharris
rickharris

8 years ago

Why do you nee DC @ 120 volts for lights