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Used alternator Answered

I went to a salvage yard and got a used alternator . My kids dad is freaking out on me because, he says I got screwed. Apparently there should be a bolt that came with the used alternator that is used to hook up the positive wire on the alternator. Is this trie?

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iceng
iceng

2 years ago

+1 Jack

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

2 years ago

It occurred to me, regarding the part you say is missing: Is it a bolt that sticks out of the back of the alternator? Or is it the nut, washer, etc, that screws onto that bolt?

I mean the nut, is a small thing, and it probably would not be difficult to find another nut.

If the bolt is missing, and there is a dark empty hole in the place where it should be, then that seems more serious, kind of analogous to a table, or chair, with one of its legs missing.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

2 years ago

Alternators need to supply large amounts of current; e.g. 50 A, or 100 A, are typical current ratings. Also, the usual connector for this large current output, is a big brass bolt, for the positive terminal, with the negative terminal connected to the frame of the alternator.

Actually, you can learn a lot about alternator wiring, just by studying those diagrams that can be found online, e.g. by way of an image search for, "alternator wiring diagram"

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=alternator+wiring+diagra...

Or asking questions, like, "What are the terminals of an alternator?"

https://www.google.com/search?q=what+are+the+termi...

If you have more specific info about the car, truck, etc, it is intended to fit into, you might even be able to find picture(s) of your alternator, or one just like it.

By the way, there exist machines for testing alternators, and friendly people who will bolt your used alternator into one of these machines, and test it for free. I wrote some words about this, in response to a previous question to this forum, here:

https://www.instructables.com/topics/best-way-to-t...

Regarding the emotional pain of buyer's remorse, you know, getting burned on a bad deal... it happens. Your story kind of reminds me of the story of Jack and the Beanstalk, in that there is someone in your family who got upset about the purchase, after the fact. Like, "You sold the cow in exchange for what?"

;-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_and_the_Beansta...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buyer%27s_remorse