78Views9Replies

Author Options:

Using modern UV active pigments for indirect lighting? Answered

I am still living from boxes after moving house but I came to a small batch of very impressive UV active powder.
This new kind glows in the dark for at least a full night with good visability and usally it sold with the color name "auqa blue" - just don't be fooled by the old style pigments that only lasted for a fe minutes, I am taking about hours here....
The images and videos I tried with my SLR and phone are all terrible, seems they don't really like UV light :(
My thought was something like this:
Having a sufficient amount of pigment in the top coat of the wall or ceiling paint to allow for a nice glow.
Either on floor or ceiling level a row of UV LED's to allow for a quick charge of the pigments, or as an alternative once technology has caught up EL panels in the UV range with a pigment coating.
An area of 5x2cm is already enough as a "reading light" for several hours or to illuminate a map during night time hiking trips.
Also with the long after glow it would be quite possible to use "light transmission".
Here you have acrylic sheets on the outside walls or roof catching the light and transporting it to the inside.
So you could use natural light during the day that would also charge the pigments on wall or ceiling.
Of course this is not really feasable for home use unless you don't require any sleep but tunnels, bunkers, mines and such could benefit especially if using fibre optics to "transport" the light to where it is needed.

Another great idea (at least I think it is) would be to use these pigments on footpaths and sporting grounds.
Imagine a footpath that glows at night and illuminates where you go!
Or imagine a big factory during a power outage at night having clear walkways to direct the workers showing up all of a sudden on the floor...
Some quality pigments still allow for over 200 lumens after 60 minutes of recharge - this is in the region of a low power LED of modern technology.
I don't think a topic like this will qualify for a best answer but I would love to hear your thoughts and ideas on the topic of these modern after glow pigments.....

Discussions

0
None
seandogue

2 years ago

I'd be concerned about the potential for toxicity. Many neato things turn out to be really harmful substances.

0
None
Downunder35mseandogue

Answer 2 years ago

If that would be a concern they would not giv a food grade rating for the stuff.
Sure not every batch comes with it but then again I did not plan to eat it....

0
None
seandogueDownunder35m

Answer 2 years ago

I must have missed the bit where you spelled out that it was food grade, which of course is one of the highest levels of safety.

I'm surprised it hasn't been actively and vociferously advertised by its manufacturers and trumpeted by environmental activists already. Sounds like an amazing substance that should be spread everywhere.

0
None
Downunder35mseandogue

Answer 2 years ago

I did not mention the "food safe" as a feature as to my knowledge it is next to impossible to obtain it in this quality.
At least I have not found a supplier that specifically states to use it.
I guess one problem for food use is the high rate of UV blocking by the pigments.
Unlike some glow in the dark paints and plastics this pigment totally blocks UV light already after less than one mm of thickness.
So to make something you can eat and that glows means all must be translucent, like jelly or a drink.
As an icing on a cake it work too but not to make the inside glow as well.
Plus of course to have anything made foodsafe today the official way is costly and usually requires massive changes in the production lines.
Dust, dirt and such won'tmatter in paint but I would like to eat it.

Advertising however is starting to take over on some websites selling glow in dark products.
The big selling point is the initial brightness and the fact that it glows throuout a whole night.
Although to be totally fair here my tests show the claims are higher than the reality.
Don't be fooled by ads stating a glowtime of 7000 hours as that is a lab result with sensitive equippment.
Once your eyes are used to total darkness and you take the previously activated pigments out of a dark container it is still visible after 2 days for me but I would not say it's enough for anything useful.
As markers for camp grounds, walking trails or to highlight your housenumber at night it is quite nice.
I tend to judge the quality of a glow product when going night fishing.
On the tip of my rod it must glow for at least as long as the bait last, with the next check it can be recharged.
Here the old style products clearly fail after about 15 minutes, especially if the moon is somewhere in front of you.
Based by comparison here at home I would say the new Aqua Blue stuff should last for this purpose about 60-90 minutes.
After all you want to be able to spot the moving tip at once and not by trying to find a faint glow somewhere in front of the sky.
Ordered a bigger amount as the few grams I had was just to test it.
If I now could find my old DSLR and charger I could use proper and fixed exposure levels to take some useful sample pics and document the glow time.
Not sure though if anyone is interested in these things...

0
None
Kiteman

2 years ago

"I don't think a topic like this will qualify for a best answer..."

True. It would be much better if you posted the same topic in the forums, which are designed for discussion & to-and-fro.

0
None
KitemanKiteman

Answer 2 years ago

(Also, a link to this amazing product would be very useful.)

0
None
Downunder35mKiteman

Answer 2 years ago

Just look for

ALKALINE EARTH METAL ALUMINATE OXIDE EUROPIUM DOPED


on your favourite online shopping site ;)
Available in light blue (auqa blue) and green-yello (kryptonite).
And yes, might have been better in the discussion section but I though someone would know something even better than these new pigments.
I intend to use them on light switches, my house number and of course some fishing lures ;)

0
None
KitemanDownunder35m

Answer 2 years ago

Oh, it's watch-dial paint!

I'd carefully check the claim for 200 lumen, then, since that's the order of brightness of a 4W LED.

0
None
iceng

2 years ago

So I Really really like Non-radio-active UV from Diamonds, to rocks, plants, liquids, Quinine, pills that turn urine to a bright blue that takes 3 flushes to dissipate, plastics, crayons, glow sticks reused, finger nails, titanium white, powders, paints, secret messages, Currency strips, Scorpions, Vaseline glass, paints, molluscs to gas_auroras and that ain't a tenth of it

https://www.instructables.com/id/SOMETHING-THAT-TUM...