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Waterglass or Liquid Glass Answered

Back when I was a kid I had a little chimistry set and part of it were instructions on how to create your own chmical garden in a jar.
The metal salts only "grow" in the areas with lots of water while being cured into somthing more solid when it contacts the waterglass.
Quite nice trick for kids of all ages.

Another and commercail use is as a binder for refractory uses.
On a home level you can just crush up some vermiculite and perlite to create solid and light weight fire bricks or plate - with just waterglass as the binder.
Although for this purpose you want a higher amount of cat litter in your mix.

Cat litter???
Yes, cat litter is the same as silica beads but it dissolves much easier in the reaction with sodium hydroxide, or drain cleaner.
60g of crystal cat litter, 80g of sodium hydroxide, 100ml of water.
Mix it carefully and without getting too much sodium hydroxide in the mix to quickly and you have a jar of watergalls - easy...

But there is other uses too, like you could see in my Ible about making your own ferrite.
In some areas it is still used as a flame retardant or to fireproof materials that otherwise would combust too quickly.
Wood that was vacuum treated with waterglass and fully dried turns into a rock like substance that looks beautiful once polished.
And it has a really hard time burning...
As it cures like glass with just little heat it was used in Fukushima by injecting it into the soil to form a barrier for the radioactive water.
The heat from the radiactive water helped curing the mix...
You can even use it to repair your cracked potter and glassware..

Holes or leaks in your exhaust system? What a pain if you are too short on money to replace the parts.
So a lot of us pay quite a bit of money for repair putties and bandages to seal the lak at least for long enough to consider a real fix.
Did you know that all these putties and such are nothing but waterglass, glass fibres and filler material?
The later often just very fine sand.
Easy to make you own in bucket loads for less than what the repair kit costs LOL

A total pain in the behind is if your old car gets a water leak.
Usually it is a seal on the pump, a hole in the radiator or a tiny crack.
One to to fix it for a while is to add an egg white to your cold radiator water or coolant.
Then go for a drive and the egg white will boil off and dry where it comes into contact with air - outside you problem.
Works remarkably well and won't harm any part of your engine either.
Only downside is that it usually only lasts for a few days, being a natural product and such.
Some people though claim they got weeks or even months out of such a cheap fix.
A btter and more permanent way to seal such tiny leaks is to use waterglass mixed into the cooling system.
It will form a lasting glass like seal that has no issiues under high heat or pressure.
It even fixes your leaking head gasket if the water goes not get into the oil jet.
Oil getting into the water might still still be fixable with waterglass.
Water in the oil means the waterglass could enter the oil and if that happens you end with glass in your moving engine bits.
A sure way to kill every engine and used to properly destroy them for recyling purposes by law in some countries.
Waterglass is added to the engine oil and then it runs until hot enough for the water to evaporate.
At this point the engine and all bearings just permantly seize.

Waterglass added to cement provides a good barrier for oil and other liquids, making a spill cleanup much easier as the spill can't really penetrate the concrete.
My personal favourite though is to use it for the easy removal of unwanted paint gretings on walls and such.
You know how some kids think that a spray can with paint and a clean wall make artwork...
If said wall is "painted" with a a mix of waterglass and sugar the spray paint will stick as good as before.
But then you come with a pressure washer and clean it off in a few minutes and without any traces left on the wall.
Sadly you need to re-apply the protective coating before the kid with the spray can comes back next night...

What are your uses for liquid glass?

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