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What is the best way to syntesize natural sunlight ? Answered

Is there anything already made to do this?

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Kiteman
Kiteman

3 years ago

1. Collect approximately 2,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg hydrogen in one place.

2. Allow it to collapse under it's own gravity.

3. Stand back...

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Poe7
Poe7

Answer 3 years ago

you say use lazers to synthesize natural sun light. Is this the best way? Others say use incandescent light. Please explain your answer.

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Answer 3 years ago

Um... sarcasm?

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 3 years ago

+1 containment is tricky.

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iceng
iceng

Answer 3 years ago

+ manny

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

I'm going to take a wild guess at this.

I am guessing what you want is some way to test, or demonstrate, photovoltaic cells or modules, but at times, or places, where you do not have access to full strength natural sunlight.

For example, if you are an educator, and you have to demonstrate some small solar powered toys, and your classroom is indoors.

The usual solution is a desk lamp with an incandescent light bulb, like 60 W, or 100 W, held at a distance of about 10 cm from the toy you want to energize.

The spectral response for a typical silicon solar cell actually has its peak in the infrared, and it will work well in the light from a incandescent light bulb, which actually emits more power in the infrared than it does in the visible part of the spectrum.

Of course, the obvious lesson your students will learn from this, is that the Sun is actually a giant light bulb.

And this is true, in a sense. Well, more exactly the Sun and the light bulb filament are both incandescent; i.e. they emit light as a natural consequence of being really hot. And you can read more about that by looking up words like "incandescence" and "black body radiation"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-body_radiation

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rickharris
rickharris

3 years ago

To do what? How close to natural do you need it to be?

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Josehf Murchison
Josehf Murchison

3 years ago

There are Grow Lights for indoor gardening.

It would be more helpful If you said what you wanted to do. Photography, gardening, or surviving in a sealed environment, all are different.

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-max-
-max-

3 years ago

Xenon short arc lamps are used in film projectors and stuff because the light emitted closely resembles that of natural sunlight. Xenon does have its disadvantages though. HID lamps of all kinds cannot be simply switched on and off willy-nilly. They need time to warm up, and turning them off and on again is detrimental to them. Also they need special ballasts to power them and especially for the bigger ones, water cooling.

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High CRI LEDs are also a very good choice. Generally LEDs have good spectrum except for cyan/blue (490nm) with CRI ~70%. If you look at the spectrum of them, they often have a large broadband hump in the red/yellow/green area due to the yellow YAG phosphor coating and then a really tall and thin spike in the blue (450nm) range. They generally lack 490nm cyan though. Good high CRI LEDs will have more/better phosphors to convert more of that blue light into red, yellow, green, and cyan. However, because a thicker phosphor coating is required for warmer color temperatures and better CRI's, efficacy will generally take a hit. good high CRI LEDs are about 70--100 lm/w with a CRI of about 90%, depending greatly on the LED chosen.

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Good old-fashioned halogen lamps can also mimic natural light. Incandescent does tend to be on the warm side (3000K), so you can add blue "gels" to the light to filter out the warmer colors to achieve the color temperature desired. However these are by far the least efficient.