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What kind of Antifreeze can i pass in some Polyvinyl Chloride tubing? Answered

I am looking at moving some Antifreeze around in some tubing. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/svge10-3-8-inches-od/925278 is the one i have. Would i be able to put something like Prestone thru it with out damaging it or causing it to leak? Also, part of the system is going to be made out of copper tubing if that can be an issue also.

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Jack A Lopez

4 years ago

The short answer is, I think antifreeze ( the kind made from water plus ethylene glycol) will be OK with flexible PVC tubing, at room temperature, or colder than that. Around 100 C, circa the normal pressure boiling point of water, most PVC, the rigid kind and flexible kind, both, start to get soft and lose strength.

Copper and antifreeze, I expect to be compatible, even at boiling water temperatures, like 100C to 150 C

That's the short answer. The long answer, is that you can look up the answer to this kind of question yourself. This is a question of chemical compatibility, sometimes called chemical resistance,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatibility_%28che...

and the way that game works is, the companies who make plastic containers, tubing, etc, publish a big list of chemicals, and a compatibility rating for their plastic with those chemicals.

Also companies that make chemicals, publish lists like this too. For example,

http://www.coleparmer.com/Chemical-Resistance

Conveniently, that list includes a chemical called "antifreeze".

That's the funny thing about these lists: they list a lot of pure chemicals, and they also list a lot of commodity stuffs, like "coffee", "gasoline", "orange juice", and also "antifreeze", as it turns out.

Supposing your thing, e.g. "Shiny(r) brand Tasty Floor Wax", was not on their list, then this requires you discover, somehow, what chemicals are in your thing. One way to discover what chemicals are in your thing, is to try to find an MSDS,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety_data_sheet

document for it, and maybe the MSDS will tell you what chemicals are in it.

Ultimately, the only way to know for sure if your chemicals and their containment are going to play nice together, is to do your own testing.