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Why a hole in the Ozone? Answered

So I have been looking up a little bit about the ozone layer and have found that about 12% of the ozone layer is reproduced by UV rays every day.  So the whole thing is replaced in about 8.3 days.  Now I think thats a little bit shorter time-span than since we stopped our mass release of refrigerants into the air.  It has even had a bit of time to catch up.  Now if you think about it, less ozone = more UV = more ozone right?  So how On earth did we blow a hole in our ozone layer, it makes absolutely no sense.  Even the fact that some of the halocarbons may still be there makes no sense because it absolutely could not affect the ozone without reacting with it.

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steveastrouk

7 years ago

No, the amount of ozone at higher levels, where the ozone is formed is constant.

Anyway, I suggest you go away and study fluoro-carbon chemistry for a bit.

Steve

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jj.incsteveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

What do you mean constant, obviously there is a hole in it now which shows no sign of Constance.

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steveastroukjj.inc

Answer 7 years ago

Darn, should have said "the amount of UV at higher levels where the ozone is formed is constant". We don't actually know if there has always been a hole in the layer over the antarctic, only that it got bigger.

Steve

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Cybermurfsteveastrouk

Answer 6 years ago

No...the hole in the ozone is a natural occurrence. the amount of UV in the upper atmosphere depends on sun activity and as we know that FLUCUATES quite a bit. the amount of UV in the upper atmosphere is also effected by the tilt of the earth and the constant seasonal darkness that occurs. not to mention solar flairs etc.. the cfc's are destroyed by the ozone when the ozone "is broken down". when ozone -- O3-- is broken down it turns back into oxygen. however less ozone means more UV then more UV means more ozone is created. (which btw is influenced by magnetic fields eg. magnetic north etc..) the amount of UV in the upper atmosphere is also effected by the tilt of the earth and the constant seasonal darkness that occurs. not to mention solar flairs etc...

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Vyger

7 years ago

You forget that the poles have no sunlight for a portion of time. Its called the middle of winter.

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jj.incVyger

Answer 7 years ago

but did you know that the ozone layer thins on its own every spring, I feel like the whole thing is a random un-understandable process.

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steveastroukjj.inc

Answer 7 years ago

You really should do some more research.

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jj.incsteveastrouk

Answer 7 years ago

That is what I am attempting to do, and it just gets more confusing, so I decided to ask around for someone who can explain why the damage to the ozone has not decreased

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steveastroukjj.inc

Answer 7 years ago

It has decreased considerably. There is a hell of a lot of CFC still around though, and used in systems that won't be cleared by approved protocols - just vented to atmosphere/

Steve