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Wiring a floor buffer Answered

In the picture I have

4 black wires a line in,2 on capacitor, 1 going to the contact switch

1 red wire coming from motor

1 yellow wire coming from motor

2 white wires, 1 from line in and 1 from motor

I am rewiring the 1.5 hp 110 volt floor buffer.
I forgot to take a picture before I cut the wires, so I need help finding what wires get attached together.

I sure would appreciate any help. Thank you!

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

1 year ago

This page,

http://electricalacademia.com/induction-motor/types-single-phase-induction-motors-single-phase-induction-motor-wiring-diagram/

might give you some hints regarding the wiring of single-phase induction motors.

I am kind of guessing the motor in your floor buffer is the one they call, "Permanent Split-Capacitor Motor" (PSC) that is shown in figures 3 and 4.

This is the kind where a winding, in series with a capacitor, is normally energized whenever the motor is running. In contrast the other kinds only energize that winding while starting, and the ones that do that, have a centrifugal switch.

So my guess that your motor is a PSC is based on the fact that other floor buffer, the Floormac PE 300, appeared to be wired that way.

Also I am guessing your motor does not have a centrifugal switch.

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jimwesselman
jimwesselman

Reply 1 year ago

Yes, I believe it does have centrifugal switch. There are some weights around the motor and when I turn it they spin outwards.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

Reply 1 year ago

Oh! Well, if there is a centrifugal switch, it probably goes in series with the winding that is in series with the capacitor, like the diagram in figure 2.

Also, if you have a multimeter, you might be able to investigate some of these guesses yourself.

You know, you could check, using the ohmmeter (aka the resistance measuring function) that the centrifugal switch is closed, when it is still.

I don't know if there is a way to reach into that switch, and gently move its little contacts to test them, but presumably those open, and turn off the start winding, when the motor is spinning fast enough.

Also a multimeter might help for figuring out how those windings are connected.

I mean, I was guessing three wires {white, yellow, red} were connected to two windings, and white was connected to the center.

If that were true, there should be more resistance when measuring across both windings, and less when measuring across just one of them.

To say it another way, if the windings have resistance R1 and R2, then expect to measure R1 or R2 ohms across one of them, and expect to measure R1+R2 ohms across both in series.

This might be made more complicated by the fact that these motor windings often have very low resistance, around 1 ohm or maybe less, and the resistance in the multimeter's probe wires might be about the same size resistance.

By the way, you can measure the resistance in the multimeter's probe wires, just by touching them together. In fact that is kind of good test to do now and then, just to check the probe wires are good.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

1 year ago

Maybe if you have manufacturer and model it would be possible to get the wiring diagram online?

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

1 year ago

I found another picture of your motor, here:

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/48...

I am guessing you are the same person who asked that question there too.

I am not sure what kind of motor is used for a typical floor buffer, but I found a diagram on this page.

https://www.cleanfix.com/products/cleaning-machine...

The wiring diagram is the last picture in this list.

https://www.cleanfix.com/website/var/tmp/image-thu...

https://www.cleanfix.com/website/var/tmp/image-thu...

https://www.cleanfix.com/website/var/tmp/image-thu...

https://www.cleanfix.com/website/var/tmp/image-thu...

https://www.cleanfix.com/website/var/tmp/image-thu...

Regarding the motor wiring seen in this example. This is an induction motor (no brushes right?), with two stator windings. One winding gets connected across the single phase mains, that is between (L)ine and (N)eutral. The other winding is connected in a similar way, except it has a big capacitor in series with it.

Is your motor intended to be wired the same way? Maybe?

By the way, you are not giving us much to work with here.

Also if you are wondering why the peeps at electronics.stackexchange could not answer your question, it is likely because you did not give them any details either; e.g. some hints about what is connected to what, or a model number, or name of a manufacturer, or any hieroglyphics that might be scribbled on this artifact.

Edit: Wait. Maybe you did give us some hints. You said the motor windings had three wires, {red, yellow, white} Do you suppose that might be two windings connected together at the white wire, with the other ends on red and yellow? Then maybe the neutral is intended to be connected to the white wire. Then there is a choice for where to put the capacitor: in series with the winding with the red wire, or in series with the winding with the yellow wire.

floormac_4.png.jpeg